William Hyde Holmes1

#921, (1794-1 July 1864)
FatherRobert Holmes (c 1770-)
MotherElizabeth (?) (c 1775-b 1842)
ChartsMike Hill - ancestors
Descendents of Robert Holmes
Last Edited24 Apr 2022
Biographical Database of Australia ID:X#30381138104.
WikiTree ID:https://www.wikitree.com/wiki/Holmes-19501.
     NOTE: The information on this page is my research to date and is subject to change as I become better informed. I very much welcome any corrections or additional info you might have - my email address is at the bottom of this page. Whilst historical facts are not copyright, my writing about these facts are. If you wish to use any text from this site on Ancestry or on any other website, please ask me first - Tim Hill.
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(For a brief history and context on the Holmes family see this page)

William Hyde Holmes was the son of Robert Holmes and Elizabeth (?) William Hyde Holmes was likely born circa 1803 at Kilmallock, County Limerick. He said he was 38 in 1842, (which has him born circa 1803), his short death notice has him at age 70 in 1864 (which has him born about 1794).2,3,4

Sir Leonard Holmes, an absentee landlord, owned a large estate at Kilmallock, County Limerick, but there is no evidence linking this family with William's family.5

He married Ellen O'Donnell, daughter of Michael O'Donnell and Eliza (?), between 1814 and 1817 at Limerick..6

William stated on his immigration forms that for twenty years had been in the Irish Police. However, he also stated on the same form that he had been a land steward and manager of a farm, and that he can keep accounts.7

William and Ellen O'Donnell may have become the parents of their third daughter Albina Hyde Holmes circa 1832 at Ireland.8

William and Ellen O'Donnell may have become the parents of their first child, a daughter, Charlotte Holmes circa 1834 at County Limerick.9

William and Ellen O'Donnell became the parents of their second daughter Frances Hyde Holmes circa 1834 at Ireland.

William and Ellen O'Donnell became the parents of Jane Holmes circa 1837 at Ireland.7

William Hyde Holmes William had a testimonial wriitten about him stating that he "has been a land steward and manager of a farm, and a storehouse(?) - is looking for a similar situation - he can write a good hand & keep accounts - his is now a burden upon the public in the Barracks". on 13 February 1842.8



To the Colonies


William and his wife Ellen emigrated with their nine biological and adopted children (and a man who was to later marry one of their daughters ) from Liverpool on 27 October 1841 on the 'Champion.7,10,11,12' After a voyage of 108 days William and his wife Ellen arrived at Sydney on 12 February 1842 with their large family. During the voyage 5 sailors committed mutiny but were eventually released by the Attorney General.7,10,11,12



William Hyde Holmes was employed by the Sydney police. Two years later, the police establishment consisted of less than eighty men. on 1 March 1842.13,14

His brother Robert received a ticket of leave dated 1 July 1842 for residence at Brisbane Waters, New South Wales.15,13 William (and presumably his spouse Ellen) lived in 1843 at Princes Street in The Rocks, in Sydney. It is not clear that the entry refers to this family, but is a reasonable speculation given that Bridget and her husband claimed to live in this same street ten years later.16

The family soon became parishioners at St. James' Church of England, thought of as the principal church in the city and one which "the congregation usually includes the family of the Governor, and a large proportion of the leading members of society. It is also decidedly the favourite resort for the more aristocratical among the votaries of Hymen". How this sat with the Holmes family isn't known, but perhaps it sat well with William and Ellen as they contemplated the future for the eight young women under their charge. With space to seat a congegation of 1500, it would have made for a bustling centre of the community.17



Rapid promotions
The Police Office, Sydney 1848
(source: Joseph Fowels 'Sydney in 1848'
Project Gutenberg Australia)


Was promoted to Sergeant in 1846. At about this time, there were 12 sergeants on the force.13,14 Each sergeant was paid 3 shillings per day. Like William, it is estimated that 70% of the police were Irish. The police had great difficulty with retention; in the 3 and half years between 1844 and mid 1847, 82 were dismissed - mostly for drunkenness - and 83 resigned; all from a muster of about 100.18 In terms of their duties, the standing orders of 1847 state that the Sergeants will "at all times, march their men to their respective posts, and march the relieved men back to the station-house, for the purpose of giving in their visits."19

His brother Robert's ticket of leave was altered to Port Stephens, New South Wales, on 21 December 1846.13

William was appointed to fill the position of district Inspector after Inspector John Pearce was dismissed from his role.20

In February 1847 he was promoted to Acting Inspector in C Division.21,22 By 20 April 1847 he seemed to be promoted to Inspector in charge of A Division.23 The remuneration of an Inspector - of which there were six - was 4 shillings per day.24

Was promoted to Inspector, and worked out the Immigration Barracks in Macquarie Street Norrth, in Sydney.25,13

In standing orders of 1847, the Inspector of Divisions will:
take the duty in rotation, from eleven o'clock at night till six in the morning; to patrole [sic] the City, visit the men at the station-houses, and on their beats, and report all irregularities and neglect of duty. He will also enter in the station-house report the time of his visit, and leave word which direction he intends taking.26





An active casebook


William was involved in a wide range of events over his years in the Sydney police, some of which must have really tested his mettle - and others that probably amused him.

On the more serious side, in 1848 a serious riot erupted over the arrest of some seamen. The Central Police Office was stormed, and the constabulary only prevailed when armed soldiers intervened, and only then after they fired into the crowd. The police then retaliated brutally.27

He was involved in dealing with a large riotous assembly, and was required to give evidence. The case was prosecuted by the Attorney General of NSW on 2 March 1850:
"RIOTING.
Richard Pearce, Joseph Joshua Jones, William Swaddling, John Hayes, Michael M'Quade, William Acheson, and James Brown, were indicted for that they, on the morning of the first of January last, together with a number of other ill-disposed persons, in number exceeding two hundred, being armed with sticks and staves, did unlawfully, riotously, and cautelously assemble and gather together to disturb the peace of our Lady the Queen ; and that the said prisoners, with others so assembled, did unlawfully and cautelously make a great noise, riot, and disturbance, to the great terror and dismay of Her Majesty's peaceable subjects, against the form of the statute in such case made and provided, and against the peace of the Queen.

His evidence was;

"Inspector William Holmes : Remembered the morning of the 1st January ; went out on duty about 8 o'clock the previous night, and continued out till 2 or 3 o'clock the following morning ; his beat was Pitt-street, principally between King-street and Park-street; the theatre is situated in that locality ; shortly after the theatre was closed, about a quarter past 12, witness caused the public-houses to be closed ; about a quarter-past 12 he heard a great shouting and noise approaching along Pitt-street from the direction of Market-street ; witness was then near King-street. Mr. HOLROYD here objected, that before any riot was proved, the prisoners must be proved to have participated in it. Examination continued : Saw the prisoner Acheson amongst the mob when assembled round a public-house called the Elephant and Castle, at the corner of King and Pitt streets ; he cried out in a loud tone of voice to the mob —" Come on to the St. James' watch-house ! come on to the watch-house !" should say at that time there was between 2000 and 3000 persons in Pitt-street between Market and King streets ; the mob at this period was at a stand. Mr. Holmes was here ordered to stand down for a time."

it continued;

"Inspector Holmes re-called : When the mob was at the corner of King and Pitt streets at about half-past 12, it consisted of at least from 2000 to 3000 persons ; as the mob came from Market-street there was great shouting and hurraing and the noise of crashing glass ;Acheson said come on to the watch-house, and about twenty followed him there ; some of the mob went along King-street towards George-street, others remained in Pitt-street ; afterwards heard a noise at Dr. Aaron's house, and the crashing of glass ; went there—there were about a hundred people there ; did not see Acheson at Dr. Aaron's house ; saw Inspector Pearce there."28



William was involved in alarming incident on the afternoon Sunday, 21 July 1850 in York Street, in Sydney, where a disorderly mob of 40 or 50 people assaulted the police; the affair only settled when the ring-leader - a man called Quinlan - was arrested.29

On Sunday, 26 January 1851 another riot took place when 300 people hooted at the police, and then threw stones. The Superintendent of Police was hit. The mob only dispersed when a proclimation agaist rioting was read to the crowd.30

Much of his work involved enforcing licencing laws. In June 1847, he attended Sparkes' Royal Hotel to investigate the 'stones, broken bottles and similar missiles' that were thrown at the shops opposite.31 A year later, William came up against Sparke again "for allowing spirits to be sold between the hours of 1 and 2 o'clock in the morning" at the Royal Hotel.32,33

William was involved in an affray outside the Royal Victoria Theatre in Pitt Street, in Sydney, with a publican, where some insults and pushing were exchanged.34

On 10 April 1854 Inspector Holmes disturbed two men assaulting a man at the Rainbow Tavern, stealing his silver watch; William captured one of the 'ruffians'.35

On Sunday, 17 December 1854 William and a Sergeant Robinson induced another 'trap' to pretend to be a traveller and enter a pub; when he was served alcohol, the publican was arrested but was given a minimal fine on a technicality.36

In May 1855, William was involved when John Joseph Ralph sought a licence for the Castle Tavern:
Inspector Holmes opposed the license, urging that the applicant had formerly been in the habit of allowing singing to be carried on in his house until a late hour in the night.

Even an intervention from the Superintendent of Police wasn't when the"singing was repeated two or three nights afterwards".37 Similarly William appeared in court to support an attempt to remove a publican's licence from John Hourigan. William opposed it as there was already a pub close by, and another was 'not required'.38

He appeared against a woman called Jaquee for keeping a disorderly house in Clarance street.39

On 21 December 1846 Robert's ticket of leave was altered to Sydney with the proviso that he live with William. He was granted a conditional pardon a week later.40,41,13

Some cases were comical, and some that weren't were still reported in a way to emphasise the entertainment value. William was involved in the arrest of a man who, in the affray, tore his trousers with his teeth.42

In November 1851 he was involved in a dispute that the newspapers of the day found comical:
MAY AND DECEMBER.-Two gaudily dressed young women, about seventeen years of age, answering to the names of Mary Daniels and Margaret Parsons, and whose personal charms were of of the first rate order, were placed at the bar, charged with steal [sic] £265. Inspector. Holmes produced a warrant, by virtue of which he had had apprehended the prisoners on Thursday last, in West Maitland. The inspector added that Margaret Parsons denied all knowledge of the robbery, and Mary Daniels insisted that it was her own property. They were searched at the female watch-house, and only one shilling was found in their possession. William Maloney, the prosecutor, was now called, and a rough looking old man who had seen between sixty and seventy wintors, with a long shillelagh in his hand, and arrayed in a costume of so grotesque a description, as to give him the appearance of a resusitated Peruvian mummy, elbowed his way into the witness-box, and refused to be sworn, alleging that Mary Daniels was his lawful wife, and he would not prosecute her. Mr. McLérie : "Is that your first wife?" ' Maloney : " No, your riverence; she's the second." Inspector Holmes: "Don't 'believe him, your worships; he has had more than a fair share of wives." Maloney : "I've only had two in this country." Mr. McLerie : "How many have you had before you came here?" Maloney: " Och, I cannot remember." The fair delinquents were then discharged from custody, and hastened out of the dock like two affrightened birds, but Mr. Maloney overtook his frail spouse within the precincts of the Court, and attempted to take her in tow, and load her to his domicile. Mary ran for her liberty, and, being hard pressed, rushed back into the court followed by the irascible old man, who told the bench that his wife preferred going to jail to returning home with him. The magistrate advised Mary to go home with her old darling, and ordered them to quit the court, when a second chase occurred, and the trembling young wife fled once more into the court, and advancing to the bench earnestly Implored Mr. M'Lerie's protection, declaring that the naughty old man had struck her, and had threatened to whip her when he got her home. The gallant superintendent of police ls not made of sterner stuff than other mortals, and the sight of beauty in distress proved irreversible. He therefore ordered some of the police to let Mary out by the private door, While Mr. Maloney was waitlng for her at the public egress, like Menelaus raving for his long lost Helen.43



In March 1850, William assisted with the arrest of a man of enormous strength who was assaulting another policeman.44

The majority of instances seem to involve the normal run-of-the mill for a policeman on his beat (with differences, given the times); horse stealing45; kidnap and robbery46,47; fighting48; escapees49,50; indecent exposure51; stolen property52; marital desertion53; firearms offences54; vagrancy55; and housebreaking.47

However, some of the cases had a strong personal element for William. William gave evidence in support a prisoner, saying that he had " known the prisoner for two years, and believed him to be a quiet, inoffensive, and hardworking man; prisoner had once assisted witness when in great peril among a mob."56,57

He captured a man who had escaped from at Gladesville Hospital for the Insane in the Sydney suburb of Lilyfield (then called Tarban Creek Lunatic Asylum). William was not to know that his adopted daughter Maria would die in the same institution.58 It was reported on 18 January 1851 that Inspector Holmes chased awy the 'groups of vagabonds' outside St. James' Church of England (his parish church) to make things safe for 'respectable females on their way to devotion' - namely, perhaps, his daughters.59

William In an interesting case, William's name was raised in court on 21 July 1850:
A " BODILY" INJURY.—The opening case of the week was that of Police Constable Richard Bodily who was laughed at, scoffed at, jeered at, and pelted mud at, by Mary Ann Riley on Sunday morning. P. C. Bodily informed their Worships, and very properly, that he looked upon himself as nothing ; but that Inspector Holmes was the real person who sustained the wrong, and therefore he (Bodily) was bound to come forward and protect him (Inspec. Holmes).36

William and Ellen lived in January 1851 at Sydney. in Macquarie street.60

William, as the father of the bride, along with Ellen attended the wedding of Bridget and Henry Hugh Hill, a worker in an ironmonger's shop, at St. James' Church of England on Monday, 20 January 1851 at Sydney.. Others who may have attended include . Bridget and Henry went on to have four children together.60,61

William was involved in a complicated case of fraud, where he entered a brothel and took a boy into custody in May 1852:
Some information having reached Inspector Holmes that the prisoner was a reputed thief, and was keeping the boy in tow, for the purpose of defrauding him of his money, the inspector followed them until he saw them enter a brothel in Castlereagh-street. The inspector followed them and saw that the boy was crying. As it appeared that signs were made to induce the boy not to state the facts of the case, the inspector took Coleman into custody on suspicion of being a runaway prisoner of the Crown. The boy then informed him that the prisoner had done him out of two notes for £50 each—that they had gone to a public house and made some marks with chalk, and tossed with a sovereign. The boy lost every toss, excepting one. The boy said that he had lost two £50 notes thus.62



William, as the father of the bride, along with Ellen may have attended the wedding of Albina and William Patrick McMunn at St. James' Church of England on Monday, 17 January 1853 at Sydney.. Others who may have attended include . William and Albina went on to have some 10 children together.63,64

In March 1853, William was involved in a violent late-night arrest in March 1853:
STREET ROBBERY.-Joseph Howard, a man who was lately discharged from custody on suspicion of assaulting and robbing a man named Smith, in Druitt- street (vide Thursday's and Friday's Emprire), and a man Griffiths Jones, were placed at the bar, charged by Inspector Holmes, an experienced and very useful police officer, with knocking down and robbing a man in King-street, about half-past one o'clock on Saturday morning. Mr. Holmes stated, that he was walking in King street, near George-street, shortly after one o'clock in the morning, when he heard a hustling sort of noise. The moon was shining brightly, but the shade from the homes partly concealed the robbers and their victim. He distinctly saw the prisoner Howard move from the spot, and noticed him to wear white trousers. A woman, named Sarah Day (an unfortunate female), called out to him "Oh ! pray make haste ; they have knocked a man down!" Mr. Holmes seized Jones, who struck him two violent blows on the arm, and extricated himself from his grasp. He, however, seized Howard, and held him until police assistance arrived. Constable Doolan ran after, and captured Jones. Inspector Holmes said, that he had not been able to find out the man who was knocked down, but saw him rise up covered with dust. While he was securing the ruffians, the injured man went away ; but if the case was postponed, and the affair was made public, the man would probably come forward. A sergeant of police said, that the woman, Sarah Day, was in the female watch-house for drunkenness ; and the magistrates remanded the prisoner until to-day, to afford time for the man who was assaulted to come forward and give evidence.65



William was assaulted when arresting a man name Slade on Tuesday, 17 May 1853; Slade had been 'riding furiously' in Pitt Street endangering an old woman and three children.66 William was assaulted by a seaman in Pitt Street, in Sydney, on Tuesday, 15 November 1853.67

William In May 1854 William arrested a man who had been annoying women in May 1854:
Wardlaw Cottingham, a young man of about twenty years of age, was charged by Inspector Holmes with disorderly conduct on Hyde Park. Mi. Holmes deposed that, in consequence of the many complaints of respectable females that they were subjected to much annoyance when walking on Hyde Park on Sunday evenings, he, last night, repaired thither in undress; on his way from the watch-house, he heard the screams of females, and soon after he entered upon the principal walk he met two respectably-attired females, shortly after passing whom three young men passed him in the same direction ; he had proceeded but a few paces after the men passed, when he heard the females screaming, and turning round saw a man on each side of the two young women who had just passed him : the men were stooping down, with their hands out, as if in the act either of laying hold of the women's legs, or raising their clothes, he could not say which; he went back, two of the men made their escape, but the defendant before the Court he secured; in his endeavour to apprehend the three men he lost sight of the females, who, consequently, were not in attendance to describe the precise nature of the treatment they received. Defendant was sentenced to pay a penalty of 40s., or to be imprisoned for three weeks.68,69



However, not everyone was quite so taken with Chief Inspector Wearin on 7 June 1856:
THE POLICE FORCE.
To the Editor of the People's' Advocate:
Sir, — Permit me to solicit your attention to as pure and classic a specimen of that; to the many, an occult and mysterious art, scientifically styled Fudgeography, which appeared in the Herald of Monday last; setting forth that "a dinner was given, by the Inspectors of the Sydney Police, to Mr. John Wearin, late Chief Inspector of the force, and to Mr. Holmes; one of the oldest and most respected Inspectors, on their retirement from the force." It is not my intention to say anything of Mr. Holmes beyond this, that his upright and consistent conduct during his connexion with the Constabulary rendered him in every way deserving of such a flattering acknowledgment of his worth as a public dinner. Would that I could speak so favorably-of Mr. Wearin ! But, in truth my own sense of propriety and justice must prevent my doing so. To bespatter a public servant with fulsome flattery — oblivious of the fact that that servant may have never, during his official career, done a single act that would entitle him to more than a cool and civil " how do you do " — would not only be preposterous but disgusting to reflecting and observing people. What, in the name of common sense has Mr. Wearin done to entitle him to the compliment of a public dinner ? Has he been very vigilant and active during his connexion with the Force ? I never heard of his having been accused of being either one or the other; His police duties were to shout out the names of the several cases on the list, and to receive his modicum of drunkards' fines, &c. This- was no very laborious occupation. I happen to recollect that of a Monday morning Mr. Wearin has pocketted to his own share from £3- to £4 of fines imposed by the Bench on drunkards and other disorderlies This was none so dusty. Thank; however, to the exertions- of a gentleman connected with the Press, those anomalies were abolished, and the penalties exacted in the shape of fines, were laudably handed over to the Benevolent Institution. Thus was it that Mr, Wearin was deprived of the pleasure of pocketing £7 or £8 weekly, of the public money, and reduced to the necessity of living within the limits of his weekly stipend. With respect to his retirement from the force, it is currently whispered that he was allowed to resign in order to save a dismissal, I will not, however; vouch for the fact, but this, I will assert that of all the police officers, Wearin was in my opinion, the least deserving of a public acknowledgment.
STAFF.70



William was again involved in a court case on 3 September 1854:
"William Williams was charged by Inspector Holmes with having resisted him in the execution of his duty. Mr. Holmes deposed that last evening he was called upon to remove a woman who, though not intoxicated, was conducting herself in a disorderly manner by throwing stones at the door of a home in Riley-street. Having apprehended the woman, he had proceeded some distance with her towards the lock-up, when he was overtaken by the defendant, who in rather a violent style endeavoured to rescue her; a scuffle ensued, and but for the assistance of some persons resident in the neighbourhood, the attempt would have been successful ; when near the look-up the defendant again came up with him, and renewed the attack. Now, however, Mr. Holmes succeeded in confining him, as well as the woman. Sentenced to pay 20s. penalty, 2s. 6d. costs, or to be imprisoned for seven days."71



William was involved in an affray in King Street, in Sydney, in November 1854:
Thomas Hand was charged by Sergeant Harrison with disorderly conduct in King-street. When Inspector Holmes apprehended Fitzgibbon in King street, for assaulting the woman Johnson, he (Fitzgibbon) resisted violently, and a crowd gathered, who followed the police as far as the watch-house, by their hooting and exclamations, exciting the prisoner to continue his vain endeavour to get away. Hand was among them, and after being repeatedly cautioned by witness, he at length replied by a dirty and insulting expression ; whereupon witness took him into custody. Hand denied the charge, but called no witnesses. Guilty : to pay 40s., or to be imprisoned for seven days.72



A case was brought against William for alleged assult and false imprisonment when police ejected a Edward McEnroe from a theatre. Although Inspector Holmes didn't actually carry out the actions, he supported the actions of his constables. The matter was settled for McEnroe with a judgement of 10 pounds against William on 9 December 1854:


"COURT OF REQUESTS.
£30 Jurisdiction.
Before the Commissioner and two assessors.

McEncroe v. Holmes.-This was an action brought by Mr. Edward McEncroe, tobacconist, against Mr William Holmes, Inspector of Police, to recover damages for an alleged assault and false imprisonment Mr. Fawcett conducted the case for the plaintiff and Mr. Brenan that for the defendant. The plaint in this case averred that said Edward McEncroe, through his attorney, Mr. Greer, complains, for that the said William Holmes did, on the 10th day of October last, assault and illtreat him, by falsely imprisoning and forcibly and illegally ejecting him from the theatre. The defendant pleaded that he was not guilty of the trespass above laid to his charge ; and, secondly, that he was acting in the matter as a police officer, and used no more force or violence than was necessary. The facts as deposed to by the plaintiff were briefly these: On the 10th of October last, Mr. McEncroe, with several of his friends attended a concert given by Miss Catherine Hayes, at the Royal Victoria Theatre. In the programme of the entertainment was a song en- titled "Old Grey Prior," to be rendered by Mr. Frank Howson. In this song there were certain words which McEncroe regarded as a reflection on Roman Catholic clergymen, and therefore offensive to himself. He seemed to think that the song had been selected for the purpose of insulting that particular denomination or which he happened to be a member. The Mr, Howson began to sing the objectionable verse, the plaintiff and a few others commenced hissing and shouting in such a violent manner as to cause the greatest uproar and confusion throughout the house. The particular stanza which gave so much offence represented the priest as "kissing pretty girls in the confessional," and going to bed tipsy. At the close of the song the noise ceased, but only for a few seconds. The audience resolved to have it repeated, and Mr. Howson had no alternative but to bow to the general "encore" so loudly and pertinaciously expressed. Of course his reappearance was the signal for a fresh burst of indignation on the part of McEncroe, who shouted "down, down, go and bag your head," and other expressions. At length Mt. Howson hearing that the song was offensive deemed it advisable, after he had got through a few lines, to substitute another song, and thereupon the noise ceased. Some ten minutes after, when everything was quiet (according to Mr. Mc'Encroe's statement), two or three constables came to where he was sitting, and dragged him with great violence out of the theatre, he begged of them not to use him so roughly as he was prepared to go to the watch-house quietly if they would only let him. He asked defendant for the names of the constables, but he re- fused to give them, saying that the men had acted under his orders, and that he was responsible for what they had done. The next day the plaintiff called upon Mr. McLerie and obtained the desired information. The matter was subsequently taken up by the Inspector General of Police, but that officer hearing it was to to give any decision in it until the decision of the Court had been delivered. In cross-examination, Mr. McEncroe admitted 'that there were loud cries of "turn McEncroe out," and there was great confusion, whilst some person in front of him turned round and said, "you ought to be you dare not put me out". He stated that he was in some degree a public character, and several times attempts had been made to eject him from public meetings. A Mr. D'Arcy, who was with the plaintiff at the time the disturbance took place, partially corroborated the foregoing testimony. He noticed the plaintiff hissing and signifying his disapprobation in the manner described. He was evidently offended at the notice; heard plaintiff say "put your head in a bag," and also heard Mr. Holmes say the police 'had acted under his orders. Mr. Howson testified to the uproar; he but there was something about kissing a girl in the confessional ; he had repeatedly sung the same song before, both in private and in; public, and he never knew any one to take offence at it with the exception of McEncroe. Mr. Brenan entered into the circumstances that the police were perfectly justified in the steps they took, and that, unless the law protected them against actions of this kind, there would be no security whatever for the preservation of peace and order. The learned advocate, however, declined to call any witnesses, being quite content to rest his case on the evidence adduced by the plaintiff.

His Honor, in summing up, went carefully through the evidence, and concluded by stating that the ques- tions for the assessors to determine were-Did they be- lieve the evidence of the plaintiff, bearing in mind that there were no witnesses called to contradict it, If they decided this question in the affirmitive, they would then have to determine whether the police had any right to apprehend the plaintiff, considering that the noise, according to the evidence, had ceased some ten minutes before the arrest took place. If the police had reasonable grounds for anticipating a breach of the peace or any riot at the instance of Mc'Encroe, then they were justified in taking him into custody ; but if they had no such grounds, if they believed the tumult had ceased, they had no right to arrest him, and in having done bo they had used more force than the circumstances of the case required. The court found a verdict for the plaintiff. Damages, £10.73,74



William was working out of The Retreat back of William Street.75



Personal life
He was retired from the New South Wales Police on 1 May 1856 and was paid an annual pension of £75 10s.76,77,78,79,80,81,82,83,84

On Wednesday, 25 June 1856, his his service was remembered on 25 June 1856:
THE POLICE FORCE-On Wednesday evening last a dinner was given to the Inspectors of the Sydney Police Force, to Mr John Wearin, late Chief Inspector of the force, and to Mr Holmes, one of its oldest and most respected Inspectors, on their retirement from the force. Both these officers have for many years held their highly responsible situations with credit to themselves and with advantage to the public. Besides a strict, active, and intelligent discharge of their police duties, they succeeded in gaining the respect of those placed under them, and of their brother inspectors. To their efforts the city owes much of that security from outrage on person and property which has distinguished it for the last eight or ten years, and a debt of gratitude is due from the citizens to those two old and faithful servants. The dinner came off at Mr Coles , Freemasons Hotel, and in liberality and good taste was highly creditable to the worthy host. To use the trite description that "every delicacy of the season was provided" would be but small praise. Every delicacy that could be wished for was not only provided, but placed on the table precisely at the right time and in the right place. The wines, too, in great variety, were of excellent quality, and completed an entertainment on a small scale certainly got up with as much taste and judgment as we have over witnessed in the colony. About thirty five or forty persons sat down, including the guests of the evening, the Inspectors of the force, many of the gentlemen engaged in the clerical department of the Police Office , several of the leading legal practitioners there, the Inspector of Nuisances, and a tew casual guests. The chair was taken by Inspector Hampton, supported by Inspector Douglass of the Water Police as vice The good things provided for the refreshment of the inner man having been disposed of in the most satisfactory manner, and the usual loyal and patriotic toasts drank, Inspector Hampton in a very excellent address proposed the healths of Mr Wearin and Mr Holmes, eulogising the conduct of those gentlemen while in the force, and congratulating them that on retiring from it they carried with them the respect and esteem of all those with whom they had been associated. Messrs Wearin and Holmes both returned thanks in neat speeches. Many other toasts were then drunk, including that of Captain McLerie Metropolitan Superintendent of Police, the ladies, the police magistrates, the legal profession, &c The name of Mr McLerie was received with warm enthusiasm. The conviviality, conducted throughout with the greatest cordiality and good feeling, was prolonged to a late hour. We hear tily congratulate Captain McLerie, and the citizens at large, that the higher officers of the police force should be composed of persons so thooughly calculated to inspire confidence as the present inspectors. Educated ind intelligent, with manners courteous and manly, they cannot fail to command the respect of those placed under their authority, or to properly estimate and appreciate the important and sometimes invidious duties they have to perform.85



He was a farmer in May 1862 at Parramatta, New South Wales.86 William and Ellen lived in May 1862 at Parramatta, New South Wales.86

On 7 May 1862 his adopted daughter Bridget died in Ballarat.87

On Tuesday, 1 September 1863 their daughter Maria married Henry Hugh Hill, the widow of their deceased daughter Bridget. The wedding between a widow and his deceased wife's sister may have been a practical arrangement, but it was regarded by many as deeply morally suspect within the Church of England. William (and presumably his spouse Ellen) lived in July 1864 at 132 Bourke Street, in Sydney.88

William died at home on 1 July 1864 at Sydney. The cause of death was stated as old age.88,89,90,91 His body was interred on 3 July 1864 at Sydney.92

A notice in the newspaper Wednesday, 6 July 1864, perhaps place by one of his children, noted his death:
Of your charity pray for the repose of the soul of William Holmes, who died at his residence, 132, Bourke-street, aged 70 years. The deceased was a native of Kilmallock, County Tipperary, Ireland. Sweet Jesus have mercy on him.93

Timeline

DateEventPlace
Family
Family
1803Birth-LikelyKilmallock, County Limerick2,3,4
1831Note memo only CR CRKilmallock, County Limerick5
1814-1817MarriageLimerick6
1825Note memo only CR CR7
1842Note CR CR8
1841Emigratn-newLiverpool7,10,11,12
1842Immigratn-newSydney7,10,11,12
1842Employment13,14
1843ResidencePrinces Street in The Rocks, in Sydney16
1843Note memo only CR CRSt. James' Church of England, in Sydney17
1846Note memo only CR CR13,14
Note memo only18
Note memo only19
1851Note memo only CR CR20
1847Note memo only CR CR21,22
1847Note memo only23
Note memo only24
1851Note memo only CR CRMacquarie Street Norrth, in Sydney25,13
Quotation type 226
Note memo only CR CR
1848Note memo only CR CR27
1850Quotation type 228
1850Note memo only CR CRYork Street, in Sydney29
1851Note memo only CR CR30
Note memo only CR CR
1847Note memo only31
1848Note memo only32,33
1853Note memo only CR CRRoyal Victoria Theatre in Pitt Street, in Sydney34
1854Note memo only CR CR35
1854Note memo only CR CR36
1855Quotation type 337
1855Note memo only38
1848Note memo only CR CR39
Note memo only CR CR
1844Note memo only42
1851Quotation type 343
1850Note memo only CR CR44
Note memo only CR CR
Note memo only CR CR
1845Note memo only56,57
1852Note memo only CR CR at Gladesville Hospital for the Insane in the Sydney suburb of Lilyfield58
1851Note memo onlySydney59
1850Quotation type 136
1851ResidenceSydney60
1852Quotation type 262
1853Quotation type 265
1853Note memo only CR CR66
1853Note memo onlyPitt Street, in Sydney67
1854Quotation type 168,69
1856Quotation type 270
1854Quotation type 1Sydney71
1854Quotation type 2King Street, in Sydney72
1854Quotation type 273,74
1855Note memo only CR CRThe Retreat back of William Street, in Sydney75
1853Residence-hideMacquarie street, in Sydney63
1856Retirement76,77,78,79,80,81,82,83,84
1856Quotation type 285
1862OccupationParramatta, New South Wales86
1862ResidenceParramatta, New South Wales86
1863Note memo only CR CR
1864Residence132 Bourke Street, in Sydney88
1864DeathSydney88,89,90,91
1864BurialSydney92
1864Quotation type 393

Family

Ellen O'Donnell (c 1806-11 Jan 1865)
Children

Citations

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  2. [S272] Assisted Immigrants to NSW, Archives Office of NSW.
  3. [S268] The Sydney Morning Herald, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia, Deaths - 6 Jul 1864, p.1.
  4. [S674] The Freeman's Journal, Sydney New South Wales, Australia, 1864 'Family Notices', Freeman's Journal (Sydney, NSW : 1850 - 1932), 6 July, p. 7. , viewed 09 Feb 2020, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article128802601 (The obituary states that he is a native of Kilmallock, County Tipperary, Ireland).
  5. [S1141] Mainchin Seoighe The Story of Kilmallock p.181.
  6. [S1] New South Wales, Birth Certificate, Registry of Births, Deaths & Marriages 1865 No. 0046.
  7. [S272] Assisted Immigrants to NSW, Archives Office of NSW "Champion", arr. 12th Feb. 1842.
  8. [S272] Assisted Immigrants to NSW, Archives Office of NSW "Champion" arr. 12 Feb. 1842.
  9. [S1200] New South Wales, Australia, Hospital and Asylum Records, 1840-1913 Ancestry.com, Name: Charlotte O'Brien; Birth Year: abt 1834; Admission or Discharge Date: 30/06/1888 (30 Jun 1888); Admission or Discharge Place: New South Wales Australia; Age: 54; Asylum: Government Asylums for the Infirm and Destitute; Title: Register of Inmates Mc-O, S-U, 1880-Nov 1896.
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  11. [S344] The Australasian Chronicle, 1842 'Shipping Intelligence.', Australasian Chronicle (Sydney, NSW : 1839-1843), 15 February, p. 3, viewed 20 February, 2011, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article31735058
  12. [S344] The Australasian Chronicle, 1842 'News and Rumors of the Day', Australasian Chronicle (Sydney, NSW : 1839-1843), 3 March p. 3, viewed 20 February, 2011, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page4232218
  13. [S369] E-mail from Nick Reddan to Tim Hill, 04 April 2011.
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  21. [S1137] The Sydney Chronicle, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia, 1847 'Maitland Circuit Court.', Sydney Chronicle (NSW : 1846 - 1848), 24 February, p. 2. , viewed 09 Feb 2020, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article31751126
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  24. [S1135] Bruce Swanton,"The Police of Sydney 1788-1862," , 1984. Currently held by unknown repository, unknown repository address p.86.
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  26. [S1135] Bruce Swanton,"The Police of Sydney 1788-1862," , 1984. Currently held by unknown repository, unknown repository address p.84.
  27. [S1135] Bruce Swanton,"The Police of Sydney 1788-1862," , 1984. Currently held by unknown repository, unknown repository address p.88.
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  29. [S268] The Sydney Morning Herald, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia, 1850 'DOMESTIC INTELLIGENCE.', The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), 26 July, p. 2. , viewed 09 Feb 2020, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article12919738
  30. [S1135] Bruce Swanton,"The Police of Sydney 1788-1862," , 1984. Currently held by unknown repository, unknown repository address p.92.
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  32. [S1131] The Goulburn Herald and Couty of Argyle Advertiser, New South Wales, Australia, 1848 'Domestic Intelligence.', The Goulburn Herald and County of Argyle Advertiser (NSW : 1848 - 1859), 9 September, p. 3. , viewed 09 Feb 2020, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article101727907
  33. [S1132] The Sydney Daily Advertiser, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia, 1848 'News of the Day.', The Sydney Daily Advertiser (NSW : 1848), 6 September, p. 2. , viewed 09 Feb 2020, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article253059939
  34. [S616] The Empire, Sydney, NSW, 1853 'SYDNEY POLICE COURT.—TUESDAY.', Empire (Sydney, NSW : 1850 - 1875), 6 July, p. 2. , viewed 23 Jan 2020, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article61325787
  35. [S268] The Sydney Morning Herald, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia, 1854 'SPIRIT MERCHANTS AND BREWERS.', The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), 12 April, p. 5. , viewed 19 Jan 2020, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article12951194
  36. [S1125] Bell's Life in Sydney and the Sporting Reviewer, Sydney, NSW, Australia, 1854 'THE POLICE REGISTER.', Bell's Life in Sydney and Sporting Reviewer (NSW : 1845 - 1860), 23 December, p. 2. , viewed 19 Jan 2020, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article59759589
  37. [S268] The Sydney Morning Herald, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia, 1855 'No title', The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), 3 May, p. 5. , viewed 23 Jan 2020, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article12968903
  38. [S268] The Sydney Morning Herald, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia, 1855 'CENTRAL POLICE COURT.', The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), 4 October, p. 2. , viewed 09 Feb 2020, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article12980772
  39. [S268] The Sydney Morning Herald, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia, 1848 'ABSTRACT OF SALES BY AUCTION THIS DAY.', The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), 2 March, p. 3. , viewed 09 Feb 2020, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article12892895
  40. [S1296] Biographical Database of Australia Biographical Database of Australia, (https://www.bda-online.org.au/) Pardons for Convicts Recommended 1826-1856 - compiled by SRNSW - 4/4479, Reel 797 & 4/4480, Reel 798 and added to BDA with their permission.; Source Refernce: 4/4480; Reel 798 Page 109.
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  42. [S268] The Sydney Morning Herald, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia, 1844 'MEETINGS FOR TO-MORROW.', The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), 9 April, p. 2. , viewed 09 Feb 2020, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article12412503
  43. [S616] The Empire, Sydney, NSW, 1851 'SYDNEY POLICE OFFICE.—SATURDAY.', Empire (Sydney, NSW : 1850 - 1875), 1 December, p. 4. , viewed 23 Jan 2020, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article60125723
  44. [S1134] The People's Advocate and New South Wales Vindicator, Sydney, NSW, Australia, 1850 'THE THEATRE.', The People's Advocate and New South Wales Vindicator (Sydney, NSW : 1848-1856), 23 March, p. 3. , viewed 09 Feb 2020, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article251536979
  45. [S268] The Sydney Morning Herald, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia, 1845 'DOMESTIC INTELLIGENCE.', The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), 18 March, p. 2. , viewed 09 Feb 2020, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article12878128
  46. [S268] The Sydney Morning Herald, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia, 1850 'MULTUM IN PARVO.', The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), 9 March, p. 2. , viewed 09 Feb 2020, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article12916303
  47. [S268] The Sydney Morning Herald, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia, 1854 'CENTRAL POLICE COURT.', The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), 23 May, p. 5. , viewed 09 Feb 2020, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article12958781
  48. [S616] The Empire, Sydney, NSW, 1852 'SYDNEY POLICE COURT.—SATURDAY.', Empire (Sydney, NSW : 1850 - 1875), 23 February, p. 2. , viewed 19 Jan 2020, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article60128073
  49. [S1125] Bell's Life in Sydney and the Sporting Reviewer, Sydney, NSW, Australia, 1852 'THE POLICE REGISTER.', Bell's Life in Sydney and Sporting Reviewer (NSW : 1845 - 1860), 20 March, p. 3. , viewed 23 Jan 2020, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article59774220
  50. [S1125] Bell's Life in Sydney and the Sporting Reviewer, Sydney, NSW, Australia, 1852 'THE POLICE REGISTER.', Bell's Life in Sydney and Sporting Reviewer (NSW : 1845 - 1860), 6 March, p. 3. , viewed 09 Feb 2020, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article59774165
  51. [S616] The Empire, Sydney, NSW, 1853 'SYDNEY POLICE COURT.—FRIDAY.', Empire (Sydney, NSW : 1850 - 1875), 8 January, p. 2. , viewed 23 Jan 2020, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article60131332
  52. [S1133] The Illustrated Sydney News, Sydney, NSW, Australia, 1853 'NEWS OF THE WEEK.', Illustrated Sydney News (NSW : 1853 - 1872), 29 October, p. 3. , viewed 09 Feb 2020, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article63613605
  53. [S616] The Empire, Sydney, NSW, 1854 'SYDNEY POLICE COURT —TUESDAY.', Empire (Sydney, NSW : 1850 - 1875), 25 January, p. 5. , viewed 09 Feb 2020, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article60148616
  54. [S674] The Freeman's Journal, Sydney New South Wales, Australia, 1853 'No title', Freeman's Journal (Sydney, NSW : 1850 - 1932), 10 February, p. 10. , viewed 09 Feb 2020, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article114832372
  55. [S616] The Empire, Sydney, NSW, 1854 'SYDNEY POLICE COURT.—FRIDAY.', Empire (Sydney, NSW : 1850 - 1875), 9 December, p. 4. , viewed 23 Jan 2020, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article60201026
  56. [S1136] The Sentinel, Sydney, NSW, Australia, 1845 'SUPERME COURT. -- MONDAY, JAN. 6.', The Sentinel (Sydney, NSW : 1845 - 1848), 8 January, p. 3. , viewed 09 Feb 2020, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article226462773
  57. [S268] The Sydney Morning Herald, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia, 1845 'LAW INTELLIGENCE. CENTRAL CRIMINAL COURT.', The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), 7 January, p. 2. , viewed 09 Feb 2020, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article12876581
  58. [S616] The Empire, Sydney, NSW, 1852 'WATER POLICE COURT.—MONDAY.', Empire (Sydney, NSW : 1850 - 1875), 17 February, p. 2. , viewed 23 Jan 2020, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article60127916
  59. [S1134] The People's Advocate and New South Wales Vindicator, Sydney, NSW, Australia, 1851 'GOLD AND CALIFORNIA.', The People's Advocate and New South Wales Vindicator (Sydney, NSW : 1848-1856), 18 January, p. 4. , viewed 18 Apr 2022, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article251532100
  60. [S271] Parish Registers for St. James, Vol.37A No.51.
  61. [S268] The Sydney Morning Herald, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia, 1851 'Family Notices', The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), 25 January, p. 5. , viewed 19 Jan 2020, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article12924347 (Interestingly, the newspaper stated that Bridget was the second daughter of William and Ellen).
  62. [S616] The Empire, Sydney, NSW, 1852 'SYDNEY POLICE COURT.—WEDNESDAY.', Empire (Sydney, NSW : 1850 - 1875), 20 May, p. 4. , viewed 09 Feb 2020, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article60137752
  63. [S271] Parish Registers for St. James, Vol.39C No.913.
  64. [S268] The Sydney Morning Herald, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia, 1853 'Family Notices.', The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), 21 January, p. 2, viewed 17 October, 2014, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article12943044
  65. [S616] The Empire, Sydney, NSW, 1853 'SYDNEY POLICE COURT.—SATURDAY.', Empire (Sydney, NSW : 1850 - 1875), 28 March, p. 2. , viewed 09 Feb 2020, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article61322889
  66. [S616] The Empire, Sydney, NSW, 1853 'SYDNEY POLICE COURT.—MONDAY.', Empire (Sydney, NSW : 1850 - 1875), 19 May, p. 2. , viewed 19 Jan 2020, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article61324345
  67. [S616] The Empire, Sydney, NSW, 1853 'SYDNEY POLICE COURT.—TUESDAY.', Empire (Sydney, NSW : 1850 - 1875), 16 November, p. 2. , viewed 23 Jan 2020, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article60146255
  68. [S268] The Sydney Morning Herald, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia, 1854 'CENTRAL POLICE COURT.', The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), 30 May, p. 2. , viewed 19 Jan 2020, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article12954375
  69. [S616] The Empire, Sydney, NSW, 1854 'SYDNEY POLICE COURT.—MONDAY.', Empire (Sydney, NSW : 1850 - 1875), 30 May, p. 2. , viewed 23 Jan 2020, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article60197789
  70. [S1134] The People's Advocate and New South Wales Vindicator, Sydney, NSW, Australia, 1856 'THE POLICE FORCE.', The People's Advocate and New South Wales Vindicator (Sydney, NSW : 1848-1856), 7 June, p. 4. , viewed 09 Feb 2020, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article251545354
  71. [S268] The Sydney Morning Herald, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia, 1854 'CENTRAL POLICE COURT.', The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842-1954), 4 September, p. 4, viewed 15 March, 2011, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article12957425
  72. [S268] The Sydney Morning Herald, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia, 1854 'CENTRAL POLICE COURT.', The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), 8 November, p. 2. , viewed 23 Jan 2020, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article12959262
  73. [S268] The Sydney Morning Herald, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia, Court of Requests, 9 Dec 1854 p.7.
  74. [S351] The Maitland Mecury, Maitland, NSW, Australia, 1854 'Sydney News.', The Maitland Mercury & Hunter River General Advertiser (NSW : 1843-1893), 13 December, p. 3 Supplement: Supplement to the Maitland Mercury, viewed 15 March, 2011, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article695817
  75. [S1271] Waugh and Cox's Sydney Commercial Directory,Sydney, NSW, Australia (1855), p.123.
  76. [S639] State Records Authority of NSW, Public Service Lists, 1858-1870 William Holmes (1858 p.32).
  77. [S639] State Records Authority of NSW, Public Service Lists, 1858-1870 William Holmes (1859 p.38).
  78. [S639] State Records Authority of NSW, Public Service Lists, 1858-1870 William Holmes (1860 p.42).
  79. [S639] State Records Authority of NSW, Public Service Lists, 1858-1870 William Holmes (1861 p.51).
  80. [S639] State Records Authority of NSW, Public Service Lists, 1858-1870 William Holmes (1862 p.60).
  81. [S639] State Records Authority of NSW, Public Service Lists, 1858-1870 William Holmes (1863 p.60).
  82. [S639] State Records Authority of NSW, Public Service Lists, 1858-1870 William Holmes (1864 p.65).
  83. [S639] State Records Authority of NSW, Public Service Lists, 1858-1870 William Holmes (1865 p.65).
  84. [S616] The Empire, Sydney, NSW, 1859 'PENSIONS.', Empire (Sydney, NSW : 1850 - 1875), 13 August, p. 10. , viewed 09 Feb 2020, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article60405997
  85. [S268] The Sydney Morning Herald, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia, 1856 'WOOL SALES.', The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), 2 June, p. 5. , viewed 09 Feb 2020, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article12978234
  86. [S265] Victoria, Death Certificate, Registry of Births, Deaths & Marriages 1862 No.3526.
  87. [S268] The Sydney Morning Herald, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia, Married - 25 Jan 1851, p.5.
  88. [S268] The Sydney Morning Herald, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia, 1864 'Family Notices', The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), 6 July, p. 1. , viewed 23 Jan 2020, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article13105547
  89. [S616] The Empire, Sydney, NSW, 1864 'Family Notices', Empire (Sydney, NSW : 1850 - 1875), 7 July, p. 1. , viewed 23 Jan 2020, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article60556388
  90. [S2] New South Wales, Death Certificate, Registry of Births, Deaths & Marriages 1864 No. 878.
  91. [S1133] The Illustrated Sydney News, Sydney, NSW, Australia, 1864 'Family Notices', Illustrated Sydney News (NSW : 1853 - 1872), 16 July, p. 13. , viewed 09 Feb 2020, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article63512029
  92. [S2] New South Wales, Death Certificate, Registry of Births, Deaths & Marriages 1864 No.00878.
  93. [S674] The Freeman's Journal, Sydney New South Wales, Australia, 1864 'Family Notices', Freeman's Journal (Sydney, NSW : 1850 - 1932), 6 July, p. 7. , viewed 10 Apr 2022, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article128802601
  94. [S268] The Sydney Morning Herald, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia, Family Notices, 25 Jan 1851 p.5 (This needs some explanation. Henry Hugh Hill's first marriage was to a Bridget Holmes in Sydney in 1851. Her father was an Inspector with the Sydney Police (this citation).

    Bridget dies and Henry marries another Holmes woman. Are these women sisters?

    The marriage is witnessed by a Jane Holmes and a Margaret Holmes.

    Shipping records indicate a Holmes family (William, wife (probably 'Ellen'), and four young children) came out on the "Champion".There were also a number of single femailes on board, including a Bridget and a Maria. William indicates he has been in the Irish Police for 20 years.

    Obituaries for a William and Ellen Holmes are consistent with him being this police inspector.

    Death certificates from either William or Ellen should list their children.).