Rev. Samuel Berjew Fookes

#190, (27 August 1822-2 November 1892)
FatherJames MacKenzie Fooks (7 Dec 1780-22 Oct 1825)
MotherJane Berjew (25 Dec 1777-15 Apr 1875)
ChartsBarbara Nicholson - ancestors
Last Edited19 Sep 2021
Samuel Berjew Fooks
     NOTE: The information on this page is my research to date and is subject to change as I become better informed. I very much welcome any corrections or additional info you might have - my email address is at the bottom of this page. Whilst historical facts are not copyright, my writing about these facts are. If you wish to use any text from this site on Ancestry or on any other website, please ask me first - Tim Hill.
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Samuel was born on Tuesday, 27 August 1822 at Weymouth, Dorset.1,2 He was the son of James MacKenzie Fooks and Jane Berjew. Rev. Samuel Berjew Fookes was baptized on Wednesday, 30 October 1822 at Melcombe Regis, Weymouth, Dorset.3 Rev. Samuel Berjew Fookes was also known as Samuel Berjew Fooks.

In Jane Iles's will on 6 November 1824 at Dorset Mary Ann Barbara Berjew, Catherine Jane Iles Fooks, Charles Berjew Fooks, William Samuel Fooks, Rev. Samuel Berjew Fookes, James MacKenzie Fooks and Jane Fooks were named as heirs.4

His father died 22 October 1825 at the age of 44. Samuel was aged 3 when this happened.5

At the age of 17 Samuel emigrated from London on 5 July 1840 on the 'Waterloo' with his mother, his sister and his brother-in-law.6,7,8 After a voyage of about 5 months Samuel arrived at England on 9 November 1840 with his family.7,9,8

For two years Samuel made a living as a dairy farmer.2,10 His name was legally changed to Samuel Berjew Fookes although this was not done by deed poll.2

He arrived in Hobart on 10 November 1842.11

On 14 November 1842 was living aboard the brig 'Patriot' which was tied up to the wharf. He was sharing a cabin with the vessel's mate; during a short absence one of his trunks was broken into and some clothing stolen. Two men were captured and remanded.12 Samuel was employed as a writing and classics master in schools working for a Mrs Betts. at Hobart.2,10,13 Samuel was employed to the family of Mr. Goldie as a tutor at Richmond, Tasmania.5,10 Samuel was employed in the English Church for the post of cathechist at Spring Bay, Tasmania.2

Soon after, Samuel began thinking of taking Holy Orders, perhaps influenced by his mother's strong christian faith, who, along with Bishop Nixon, assisted him in his preparations.1415
Samuel advertises for students
Source: The Courier 7/1/1845


He conducted a school for young gentlemen at 2 Barrack Street, in Hobart, in Classical and European languages, and "every branch of science calculated to promote moral as well as intellectual improvement", opening for the first time on Monday, 13 January 1845.11,16,17

In October 1846 he donated one pound to a fund raised to fund a scholar in connection with the Diocese of Tasmania.18 He was Rector on 20 February 1847 at St. Lukes Anglican, in Richmond, Tasmania.19

He married Margaret Sarah Westbrook, daughter of Dr. Samuel Westbrook and Mary Margaret Mason, at St. John the Baptist on Saturday, 20 February 1847 at Buckland, Tasmania. He was 24 and his wife Margaret was 24. Witnesses to the wedding were Dr. Samuel Westbrook.20,21,22

Samuel attended a meeting at The Lennox Arms Hotel, in Hobart, protesting the introduction of Sydney convicts into the colony.23 Samuel, aged 25 and Margaret Sarah Westbrook, aged 25 likely became the parents of Rev. Henry Samuel Cox Fookes on 11 January 1848 at Richmond, Tasmania.22 Samuel was employed by the Reverend F. H. Cox as curate.14,10

On Thursday, 21 September 1848 Samuel was ordained by the Bishop of Tasmania.24,25,26,14,11

He was introduced to the Govenor on Thursday, 24 May 1849 at a large reception at Government House, in Hobart.27

Samuel was injured in a riding accident on 26 January 1850:
ACCIDENT.-On Sunday last, as the Rev. S. B. Fookes, of Jerusalem, was going to the Little Lovely Banks for evening service, he was thrown from his horse, and dragged the distance of eight or ten yards. He was found by one of Mr. Mercer's tenants in a state of insensibility, which lasted for nearly three hours. Though much injured in the head and left arm, Mr. Fookes is slowly recovering. To those who are acquainted with the facts of the case, it seems wonderful how life was preserved.28



Rev. Samuel Berjew Fookes was one of a number of Anglican ministers to sign a petition against transportation, largely on the grounds of the effect that would have on the colony and the colonists (rather than the effect on the convicts). He signed a similar petition two years later. in December 1850.29,30

He was ordained as 'Missionary Chaplain' on 11 June 1851 - formerly Convict Chaplain - and was posted to Impression Bay (now Premaydena), Tasman Penninsula, Tasmania.11

In 3 July 1852 29 was appointed as a Surrogate for issuing marriage licences within the diocese at.31,32

Samuel was elected as a member of the Royal Society of Van Diemens Land.33

In October 1852 he contributed one pound and one shilling for the erection of the St. John's in Goulburn Street.34 Samuel and Margaret lived in 1854 at Impression Bay (now Premaydena), Tasman Penninsula, Tasmania.35 Rev. Samuel Berjew Fookes was was described in his wife's obituary as 'Chaplain to the Invalids' on 11 June 1854.36

His wife Margaret died 11 June 1854 at the age of 31, leaving him a widower at age 31.37

With Margaret's death and the strain of work in the prison, Samuel's health deteriorated. Combined with the reduction in convict establishments, it was decided that he should take up other duties.38,14

Rev. Samuel Berjew Fookes was appointed as Chaplain, a post it is thought he occupied from October 1854 to December 1857. His annual stipend was £200 with a forage allowance of £50 on 1 September 1854 at St. Paul's, in Circular Head, Tasmania.39,40,11

In November 1854 he visited the remote site of The Chapel, in Forest, Tasmania, as Bishop Nixon conducted a service in Stanley. Whilst there, they also attended the school (Bishop Nixon described the visit in his book “The Cruise of the Beacon: A narrative of a visit to the islands in Bass's Straits”.41

On Sunday, 12 November 1854 eight young people were presented for confirmation by the bishop; they had been prepared by Samuel.42

He married Louisa Jean Hobkirk, daughter of John Peter Hobkirk and Frances Mary Lecosne, at Trinity Church on Monday, 7 May 1855 at Launceston, Tasmania. He was 32 and his wife Louisa was 21.43,44,45

On 17 October 1855 his character was impunged by a letter to the paper, to which he gave a response.46

34 was associated with the opening of a new church at Circular Head, Tasmania, in April 1857.47

In October 1857 he was apponted to St. Matthias, in Windermere, Tasmania.11

When his departure from Circular Head, Tasmania, was announced in late 1857, seventy eight of his students signed a letter of thanks to him for their religious instruction, to which he responded.48 He eventually had to give up the Windamere post due to the amount of boating on the Tamar that he needed to do to maintain the Parish.10

In May 1861 he was appointed to St. Andrew's Anglican, in Perth, Tasmania.11 Samuel lived in July 1861 at Colebrook Dale, Tasmania.49

On 5 July 1861 his daughter Amy died at the age of 9 a day before her tenth birthday. Rev. Samuel Berjew Fookes received the Archbishops degree of Master of Arts on Bishop Nixon's recommendation circa 1864.10

Samuel was appointed to the School Boards at Breadalbane, Tasmania, and Perth in January 1870.50,51

Samuel read the daily service on New Year's Day 1870 to members of the Working Men's Benefit Society, and delivered a generous message, commending them on the good work they had already done.52

He attended a meeting of the Evandale Church of England Parochial Association at at Municipal Council Chamber in the small Tasmanian town of Evandale on Friday, 21 January 1870. Samuel read 'the Sea-Captain's Story' by Lord Lytton.53

He addressed a crowd of about 200 at the Morven St. Andrew's Working Men's Benefit Society at the small Tasmanian town of Evandale in the afternoon of Wednesday, 20 April 1870.54

A Penny Reading was held at Temperence Hall, in Perth, Tasmania, on Tuesday, 17 May 1870; Samuel was chair and spoke on the necessity of preserving order by the audience, before the entertainments began. A subsequent meeting held four weeks later had a very large attendence, despite very poor weather.55

He presided over a 'silver reading' at Perth, Tasmania, on Tuesday, 12 July 1870 at which there were many musical entertainments.56

He resigned from the Breadalbane, Tasmania, school board in August 1870.57

Samuel attended a meeting of the Northern Archdeaconry hosted by Archdeacon Browne at St. John's, in Launceston, Tasmania, after divine service and sacrament.58 He wrote a long letter to the paper after he felt he was gagged at the ecclesiastical meeting held at Elizabeth Street schoolroom, in Launceston, Tasmania, after the divine service.59,60

In a letter to a newspaper published on Saturday, 21 January 1871, Samuel was lightly rebuked for raising an unstated issue at a meeting of the church leadership regarding the minister at Avoca.61,62

He attended the seventh quarterly meeting of the Church of England Parochial Association at Evandale on Tuesday, 24 January 1871. There were a number of speeches given, as well as some musical entertainments. The evening finished with a short speech of thanks by Samuel.63

As part of a densely crowded service on Sunday, 29 January 1871 at St. Paul's Anglican Church, in Launceston, Tasmania, he delivered "a lengthy and interesting sermon" from 1 Corinthians titled 'Who then is Paul?64'

A letter he had written was published on 7 June 1871:
Sir, - having divine service my church at 9 a.m. on Fridays, it is very rarely that I can attend the meetings of the Finance Committee, which are held in the public library, Launceston, at 11. Therefore I am thankful for the digest of the proceedings which appears from time to time in your columns. The Cornwall Chronicle of to-day contains a statement to the effect that the last meeting was adjourned to the 9th instant, in order that more time may be given for the supply of certain returns clergy have been requested to forward, from which it appears that there have been defaulters in this respect, of which I am one as I always come away from attendance at finance meetings with a profound conviction of the inadequacy of the work done to the time and expense entailed in a journey to Launceston, I prefer with your kind permission, to state publicly what are my reasons for withholding this information.
In the middle of last month I received a circular from the Archdeacon of Launceston requesting me to forward the names and addresses of a few heads of families attending churches served by me for the purpose, I suppose, of making direct application to them in behalf the church fund. There could be no possible objection to this taken per se, but when it involves as I take it, responsibility on the part of the clergyman deciding who are and who are not to be included in this category, I declined to place myself in any such invidious position. From my point of view the parishioners of a cure, as such, are exactly on an equality, and the rite, so-called, is, in my opinion, quite as eagerly to be sought for from the poor man, and quite as acceptable as the more splendid offerings of the rich in behalf of the maintenance of the church. No parish priest can, I fancy, escape the conviction gathered from experience in his own particular sphere of work that no more unquenchable fire brand could be sent blazing through his cure than that of his being a party to making comparisons between what he may think important and unimportant people committed to his spiritual charge. Clearly it is no part of the incumbents duty, and he should never be asked to do it. The churchwardens are parties to whom the application should be made upon all points (?) with money(?). On this ground I object to send the returns asked for, and (?) of (?) manner in which the request was made. Appended to the circular was an endorsement to the effect that the answer might be forwarded to Mr. B. W. Campion, "by order of the Archdeacon." Well, really this is rather too much, and in order to put an end to such arbitrary announcements I here state that I recognise the power and authority of no man living, be he Archdeacon or not, to "order" me to send returns to any member of the finance committee who may think it wise or desirable to submit his own visionary ideas on church finance for consideration of the Board.65



On Tuesday, 13 June 1871 he wrote a letter to several newspapers attacking another newspaper columnist, suggesting:
he must have taken lessons in grumbling at the very table of a certain school of circumlocution established in The North, whose perennial mission appears to be how-not-to-do-it.66,67



He was mentioned a meeting of the Finance Committee of the Archdeaconry of Launceston, Tasmania, on Friday, 16 June 1871. Samuel had been asked whu he had not submitted a return; he was reported to have said that no one had a right to demand that a clergyman should put himself in such an unenviable position as to make private remarks about his parishioners.68

Whilst the minister of the Perth parish, he attended a meeting and entertainment at Evandale on Tuesday, 1 August 1871 with the object of raising money for the church.:
The first part of the evening's entertainment consisted of sacred music and recitations, in which several ladies and gentlemen took part, whose efforts were duly appreciated. During the interval ... the rev. Chairman requested the several collectors to bring forward their cards and pay the money which during they had" collected the past quarter, to the treasurer. The sum brought in amounted to nearly £10

The address by the chairman laboured the point about how important it was for the laity to support the church through their actions, and through their willing donations.69,70 He was became curate circa 1872 at St. Luke's, in Richmond, Tasmania.11,10

A New Years Day celebration was held in Perth, Tasmania, by the Working Men's Benefit Association, including a service at St. Andrew's conducted by Samuel and other activities for the community such as much marching around and "an excellent dinner."71,72

Samuel joined in the fête for St Paul's Sunday School at Stanley, Tasmania, on Thursday, 18 January 1872, travelling the distance up from Perth. He took part in playing cricket, and made a brief address.:
The weather was all that could be desired. There was abundance of everything refreshing, and confectionery so plentiful that handfuls were occasionally thrown among the juveniles, who, forgetful of their games, rushed to secure some of the delicious sweets. The ladies were most assiduous in attending to the wants of all. The children — overgrown ones, included — joined in the various games with spirit, and apparently enjoyed themselves to their hearts' content.73



He attended the Soiree at Breadalbane, Tasmania, on Thursday, 25 April 1872, having travelled down the night before.74

He conducted a wedding on Wednesday, 1 May 1872 at Perth, Tasmania.75

A large crowd, far greater than the 200 hundred seat capacity of the building, attended the consecration of at St. Andrew's new Anglican church in the small Tasmanian town of Evandale on Friday, 17 May 1872. Samuel was one of more than a dozen clergymen who attended that day.76

A concert was held at Breadalbane, Tasmania, on the evening of Monday, 26 August 1872; Rev. Samuel Berjew Fookes presided, and thanked those who attended. his daughter Grace performed 'Sweet Dublin Bay' and 'I'm so tired' "in such a pleasing manner as to call for an encore". Two unnamed Fookes girls also performed a piano duet.77,78 He was the minister at the wedding of William Reid and his daughter Mary Jane Fookes at St. Andrew's Anglican on Thursday, 24 October 1872 at Perth, Tasmania.79,80,81,49 Rev. Samuel Berjew Fookes was the incumbent at the Perth parish in November 1872.82 He gave a deposition on the death of his son, as did the boy's mother and the doctor.83,84,85,86,87

On 15 November 1872 his son Arthur died at the age of 5 killed by the kick of a horse in a paddock adjoining their home in Perth, Tasmania.88,89,90

As Incumbent of the parish at Perth, Tasmania, he officiated at the funeral of John Helder Wedge, an old colonist and former member of the Legislative Council of 80 years. The funeral was held on Monday, 25 November 1872.82,91



The 'Ritual' controversy at Richmond
It was announced in the papers on 8 February 1873 that Rev. Samuel Berjew Fookes was to take up the incumbency of Richmond, Tasmania, moving on from Perth. He swapped positions with Rev. Galor for unstated reasons.92

On Thursday, 10 April 1873 he reported that a horse of his was 'stolen or strayed' at Jerusalem (now Colebook), Tasmania; the horse was an aged chestnut, with a white blaze down its face.93

As minister of the Richmond parish, he attended a customary annual tea meeting held with the congregation of St. John's, in Hobart, on Thursday, 4 December 1873. The occasion was the departure of Reverend Canon Bromby for St. David's Cathedral. Samuel stated that he had never attended a tea meeting before, but that he that he never attended a meeting that gave him more satisfaction. He recalled his memories of St. John's from 30 years ago, and the paucity of parisioners then.94,95

Samuel took part in the ceremony that celebrated the consecration of St. David's new Cathedral, in Hobart, on Thursday, 5 February 1874. The Governor and the Bishops of Tasmania and Adelaide attended.96

A meeting of the St. Luke's parishioners took place at Council Chambers, in Richmond, Tasmania, on Tuesday, 3 March 1874. The meeting was called on to "take into consideration certain new practices" that Samuel had instituted at the church that some in the congregation had seen as ritualistic.
The chairman suggested that Samuel was "sincere in his convictions" and "performed his duties faithfully and well" but there were concerns in the way he conducted his services.
At this point Samuel rose and said he "objected to the chairman using his name, or referring to him in any way whatever" and gave a statement to the chairman:
"I protest against the validity and legality of the meeting of parishioners convened by Messrs. Read and Ogilvy, churchwardens of St. Luke's, Richmond, to be held at the Council Chamber, Richmond, on Tuesday, March 3rd, 1874, on the following grounds, viz., 1. Because it is convened by two churchwardens, and churchwardens, as such, have no legal power to convene such a meeting. 2. If such power exists, it is not competent for any two such church officers to act in such a manner without opportunity having been given to the incumbent and his churchwarden to express concurrence or dissent from such a course. 3. Because the Synod of Tasmania has expressly defined the course to be taken under the circumstances described in the advertisement signed H. E. B. Read and David Ogilvy, churchwardens, convening this meeting, as follows-' It shall pertain to the office of the churchwardens to report to the Bishop any irregularity of conduct on the part of the minister, and any teaching contrary to the doctrine of the church, remembering always to exercise due caution, and in no case to found such report on slight evidence or anonymous information.' 4. Because the incumbent of a cure is the only person legally invested with authority from the Synod to convene a meeting of parishioners within the limits of any cure.


The meeting resolved to not entertain Samuel's protest as its purpose was to "ascertain the sentiments of the parishioners", not to judge or complain, and Samuel's stayed. The meeting then rather hypocritically agreed to a resolution that they were opposed to the recent changes "particularly the priest at the communion table". The meeting then voted that Samuel should stop praciticing in the new way "if compatible with (his) conscientious convictions on the subject". All of the others, except two, signed this resolution.
Samuel replied to the chairman in writing, stating that he would comply, but didn't admit that what he was doing amounted to "ritualistic practices".97,98

The Bishop was invited to preach at Richmond, Tasmania, on Sunday, 15 March 1874; in an advertisment that Samuel put in the paper, it was noted that collections in aid of repair of the church would take place during services.99

Samuel convened a meeting of the parishioners of Richmond, Tasmania, on the afternoon of Tuesday, 7 April 1874 to determine "in whom the patronage of the Cure shall be vested" whilst he attended the Synod.100

Samuel's relationship with the members of Richmond, Tasmania, spiralled badly out of control, and it became clear that he didn't have the confidence of other members of the Cure. A meeting was called but he did not attend. Two letters were presented by Samuel; the first, written a week previously ended:
It is incumbent upon me now to apprise you officially, that it is my intention to give up the cure as soon as circumstances will permit. After what I consider the shameful indignity to which I have been exposed through your advertisement, inserted without even the common courtesy of making me acquainted with the intention, there is nothing else, in my estimation, to be done. Unfortunately my landlord absolutely refuses to release me from the engagement of the house I now occupy, or I should be glad to relieve the parishioners of myself and my family before the closing of another day.
I remain, Sir,
Your obedient servant,
SAML. B. FOOKES.

The meeting voted to invest the patronage of the Cure in a board.101 The Mercury reported that at the meeting the parishioners "expressed a general regret that there should be any difficulty ... (in Samuel) carrying out his threat."102

A letter he wrote was published on 15 April 1874:
SIR,-I beg that you will allow me to correct an error which I notice in the letter published in your issue of Saturday last, addressed by me to Mr. H. Read, of Richmond. In place of the words " on the very faith of the fact that he had made a complaint of decorations before," it should be "in the very face of the fact that he had made a complaint of decorations set up by me before."
I notice also that you omitted a portion of the letter on your own responsibility. From being accustomed to "call a spade, a spade," I cannot recognise the force of your objection, but inasmuch as it was not intended for publication, but merely to intimate that I had well conned the signatures of the document arising out of the meeting alluded to, it matters little. The correctness of the statement has not been challenged by the churchwardens or any one else. Regarding the meeting on April 7th, issuing in the election of a Board of Patronage for the cure of Richmond, I have a grievance, which shall be stated as briefly as I can. If the mania existing in my neighbourhood for having the distinction of reading one's name in print is to be carried out to the extent of inserting the ecclesiastical squabbles of this Parish to the boring, usque ad nauseam, of the Tasmanian public, in all justice and honour let us have it fairly done. It is neither one nor the other on the part of your correspondent, whoever he may be, to send you letters of mine for publication, whilst carefully avoiding to do so as to those written by other people that preceded or intervened. Your report contains the names of the persons present at the meeting aforesaid. One of these is certainly a constant church-goer, and but one. Five have never, to my knowledge, been present at any service during my residence here. The rest, some occasionally, others very rarely indeed. How it is possible that inhabitants of a cure, attending divine worship in it according to their own caprice and convenience, or not at all, can sign the document required by Synod law before the proceedings of such meetings can be valid is beyond my reach. In this case, I fear that necessary preliminary has been omitted or altogether ignored.
I should like to ask any of your readers who are au fait in such matters, upon what principle we are to judge of the mysterious connection that sometimes shows itself between things ecclesiastical and things municipal ? When the churchwardens here wished to put me a la St. Lawrence, on the gridiron of public opinion, with respect to my alleged High Church proclivities, the Council Chamber, where criminals meet their doom, must be the arena in which the gentle process should be carried out. There were present the Warden (in his chair of State), two or three councillors, a petty constable, the Superintendent of Police, and the Council Clerk, J.P's. (judges of prelate, priest, or parson, no matter) and last, though not least, a heterogeneous assemblage of about forty people to back them up. All this to worry one man, who, by the very nature of his office stood in a defenceless position, and was absolutely friendless. Much the same thing has been repeated, as appears by the names in your columns of Saturday last. Now all this parade and publication may be very satisfactory to the agents themselves, but, to my thinking, it is very unpleasantly suggestive of thumb-screws, or that gushing creature "the old maid," or the pillory or the rack. Altogether anything but congenial with the days of religious freedom in which we live, Certainly all ministers of the gospel are detectives in their way, by hunting up transgressors, and rebuking them according to their merits, and this may account for the extraordinary sympathy manifest between one of them at least, and the whole posse of crime-preventers or punishers in this little village. There is a limit to being " cruel to be kind," and I could get along quite well enough without quite so much attention on the part of the Municipal and judicial authorities.
Yours truly.103



Another one of his long letters was published in The Mercury on 21 April 1874:
SIR,-Considering that the tide of public feeling has set most decidedly against the party in the English Church, to which I am not ashamed to acknowledge my adherence, both from taste and conviction, I take it kindly that you inserted the letter which I addressed to you before. Now I ask permission to " make a clean breast of it," with respect to the misunderstanding between two of the wardens of St. Luke's Church, Richmond, and myself, and there I shall leave it.
My complaint, therefore, against them now is point blank this, viz: That they not merely ¡llegally convened a parochial meeting without making any provision for the exclusion of attendants, not members of the Church of England, and of notoriously immoral character, but also exhausted, without any just cause, all human ingenuity in devising that the sting of ignominy should stick fast into me, as if I deserved to be despised and shunned by the rest of mankind. I leave out altogether the unwear¡ed diligence displayed in inducing people of all classes to attend the meeting aforesaid, worthy, as it was, a juster and a better cause. In addition to the officials before named as present, vis-a-vis with myself, were the doctor and the undertaker of the village, side by side, and, in the rear the sexton and grave digger of the church which I serve. It is not to be denied that these functionaries are useful in their way, and in their turn, but when an unsupported man has to face those who have declared open war with him, with the odds of 40 to 1 against him, their proximity is by no means cheering. I am not likely to forget the thrill of horror that passed through me, when I saw that the two first, by their looks and gestures, meant mischief. " You move," said the Chairman, in his blandest tones, to the knight of the sable plumes, " that the Incumbent's protest be not received." " I do." Therefore exit protest. Now that is a summary proceeding that gives one anything but an exalted idea of Richmond justice, for the protest was legal, respectfully worded and true. Still " a man is a man for a' that " it may be said, and so he is, but when such a document of truth is thus hurried off the scene without discussion, he must feel himself a man considerably humbled. " If the incumbent does not come to our terms," said the medical man of the district, " we must try other means." I despise threats, especially from the faculty, because we all know what those " other means " signify. Repetetur hautus ! Bis ! "Throw physic to the dogs say I, and get them to take it if you can." Another informed the meeting that the incumbent told his wife that he was " low," i e. in church ideas. There could not be a doubt about it. It is quite true, I acknowledge. Those are specimens of how people talk and act when they are resolved on putting down a man who only " turned his back upon them." Now, Tasmania is a free land, and if I am " wanted," as my friend the superintendent would say, in the baking, dissecting, or undertaking line of business, I take leave to ask for time. At Fiji, the realm of King Cakobau, the method of securing a missionary is merciful, because prompt, and an undertaker's impatience to secure the victim, can be gratified even to the naming of the day and the hour. If the people that are so anxious for my exit from Richmond (according to your report of 7th inat.), will accompany me, thither I will repair, because it is too much for flesh and blood to stand the sure but slow "dissolving process" in vogue among the faithful, when they desire to make it a warning to a working parish priest in this Christian land.
It is said, without any irreverence for their office, but really, ¡n my opinion, those churchwardens are living out of time. Years ago, when man dare not for the life of him say " I am a Christian ! " they, and many others I know besides, would have been in their element. Now, Heaven be praised, the civil law protects tho guiltless without respect of persons. Therefore, the appeal is to the vulgar demand " Lie down, sir, and let us kick you." Certainly, I am not what is commonly known as a muscular Christian, but I do object to that, and say, with Shylock, " Is it so nominated in the bond ?"
All this " worritting" and baiting and badgering might find some excuse, if the actors were men who showed by their deeds that they were sincerely working for the Church's interests. How is it at present with the ohurch warden regime at Richmond ? Just this. On my arrival a year ago there was not to be found a single record of any parish meeting since the chaplaincy was founded in 1834, not even a minute or a scrap of paper. The offertory accounts have never been forthcoming, and consequently never balanced from time immemorial, until the last meeting in December. There is a considerable amount of money due to the Church, and yet it remains in a state of leakage and general disrepair, entirely from neglect. A year ago I showed to one of the present churchwardens the state of the chancel, and thus it remains. One of the vestries leaks like a sieve, and the graveyard is disagree to any civilized community. It is too much trouble for the wardens to collect the alms on Sundays, so the sexton does it. " Now, these are the men who presume to talk to me about disobedience to the law, and bring me to the bar of public chastisement. These are the men who dare to dictate to me about tho holiest matters connected with the Christian religion, as if they were " masters in Israel" " without spot or wrinkle." I don't "see it" that my work in the cure should thus be hindered, and probably my life be shortened. Like most mortals, I am not yet quite tired of being " here below," and wish to live if I may be allowed. "Yes," as one of the churohwarden fraternity, well known within the cloisters of St. David's, taught us tyros in senatorial eloquence to ask in Synod, " why not? Why not ?"104



On Wednesday, 22 April 1874 it was reported that he resigned from the local school Board at Richmond, Tasmania, no doubt a consequence of the difficulties Samuel was experiencing. his resignation was accepted.105,106

The Mercury published a letter from "The District Medical Man" concerning the situation at Richmond, Tasmania:
Sir,-The working parish priest of Richmond, (as the incumbent styles himself), in his letter of the 21st inst., quotes, " If the incumbent does not come to our terms," said the medical man of the district, "we must try other means." As the said parish priest in a former communication, takes you to task for omitting part of his letter, and says he likes to call a " spade a spade," I will follow his advice and at once say that his quotation is a deliberate untruth.
I have not the time or inclination to carry on a Billingsgate correspondonce with the incumbent, therefore shall personally take no further notice of any of his truly Christian effusions that the public may be favoured with.,
Yours truly,
"THE DISTRICT MEDICAL MAN."107



He was subjected to an attack in the newspaper on 25 April 1874:
REV. S. B. FOOKES. TO THE EDITOR OF THE MERCURY
Sir, For upwards of twenty years I have known the correspondent who has of late increased his notoriety, in your columns, under the signature of " S. B. Fookes." During that period his hand seems uniformly to have been against every man, and his name all along has been a by-word throughout the land. In his last letter, which, by the way, is about the vilest production that one might expect even from a fighting man, he does not wish to be considered a muscular Christian.
Now, as he has during the above period ever shown a readiness to quarrel with man, woman, or child, I cannot but think thal it would be well if he would come out as a muscular Christian. Those he so readily abuses might then have some chance; for what chance has the quill with a half crazy man ?
Yours truly,
WHY NOT?108



Samuel unleashed another salvo:
Sir,-I hoped that I should not be obliged to write to you again about " Church matters at Richmond," but a letter in your ¡ssue of April 22nd, signed " The District Medical Man," obliges me to do so.
It is, I believe, the custom in the mother country and elsewhere, for journalists not to admit answers under a nom de plume, in reply to letters to which the writer has affixed his signature, and, in my estimation, the custom is "honoured in the observance." You, evidently, follow other ways. So the only reply I deem it necessary to make to the letter aforesaid is this: I took notes of all the proceedings at the meeting alluded to in it, and if your correspondent "The District Medical Man" will have the courage to come out of his shell and sign his own name to any charge he may have to make against me, I am prepared to verify all that I have written to you.
It is admitted that my letters ran in a free and easy style purposely, because, being of some length, unless so written, no one would take the trouble to read them. They were true and accurate for all that.
It has come to my knowledge that my tormentors are arranging another meeting, which cannot be relative to " position," for that has been altered, in obedience to tho Bishop's will. Apropos of this, I forgot to mention before that six months' before the Council Chamber assemblage, when one of the wardens of St Luke's Church objected to my standing to say prayers in exactly the same way as the whole congregation - from Chancel to Tower - stand with regard to each other, I told him that if he would obtain an order from the Bishop, I would alter it on the following Sunday. Instead of getting the order, he afterwards apologized to me for his rudeness in the interview referred to. So I have asked and never got an answer, " what just cause was there for bringing me to this extremity ?"
Lastly, with regard to tho coming meeting, I shall attend and take notes as before, and if the "District Medical Man," or any other person present, thinks it well to threaten me as I was threatened, I shall make short work of it by applying in Hobart Town to have them bound over to keep the peace. The Council Chamber is a public place, and the law refuses sanction, in very plain terms, to such transgressors as these.
Yours truly,
S. B. FOOKES.

The editors attached their own comment that Samuel "simply descends to quibbling" and that (t)he signature of " The District Medical Man " was as far from being anonymous as would have been that gentleman's usual signature"; further that the rest of Samuel's letter was "unworthy of his sacred calling". The editors go on to wonder if Samuel "has recently read the Evangelist's account of his Great Master's life, or any of the epistles of the apostles" and speciously "recommend him, when he next feels himself labouring under the cacoethes scribendi ... to sit down and write a homily, say, for instance, from 1 Peter, 3, 8, 9, and 10 verses:" rather than rushing into print.109

In a newspaper article published on Friday, 1 May 1874, Samuel was subjected to another attack from David Ogilvy:
SIR,- I reluctantly ask you to allow me one more communication to appear in your journal on the sickening subject of Richmond Church affairs, and, if you kindly comply, I will not under any provocation trouble you again on the subject.
During the past few months I have received a number of letters from the Incumbent, so offensively worded that I refrained from replying to any one of them, and would not now have taken up my pen had he not in his letter to you, published in last Monday's issue, repeated an assertion made by him before in a letter to the Bishop, reflecting upon me, to this effect : That the Warden, meaning myself, who, at the request of some of the parishioners, asked him to explain why he turned his back upon the congregation during certain parts of the service, afterwards apologised for his rudeness upon that occasion ; in his letter to the Bishop he says I did this in writing. To this assertion I give the flatest contradiction ; it is a wilful untruth. I did not even write to him at all upon any subject whatever at that time. I refrain from entering into any particulars relative to these distressing disputes, believing that your readers take no interest in them, and that even if they did, a newspaper is not the proper place in which to detail them.110



On Tuesday, 5 May 1874 a letter he wrote was published in The Mercury:
Sir,-As you have re-opened your columns to a correspondent respecting " Church matters in Richmond," I believe you will do me the justice to insert a reply to it.
It is inconceivable to me what possible business or interest the readers of your journal can have in a letter sent by me to the Bishop of Tasmania ; and in my last to you I went not a whit beyond the fact, that one of the churchwardens in this cure had apologised to me, instead of applying to the Bishop for what he wanted. I will give your correspondent credit for consummate adroitness in attempting to make people think that he has never apologised to me at all on account of his conduct, and that I am guilty of " wilful untruth " in regard to it, whereas he did so twice-once in person, and subsequently in writing.
The following copy of the portion of my letter to the Bishop referring to it will be, I should think, a sufficient refutation :-
" Richmond, January 24th, 1874.-The Lord Bishop of Tasmania, Hobart Town.-About six months ago, Captain Ogilvy called at my house, and objected to the position I take in conducting divine service within the chancel of St. Luke's, Richmond ; to which I replied that the person to be addressed by a parishioner aggrieved at the conduct of a clergy man was the Bishop, and that if he (the Bishop) ordered me to alter the position I would do so on the following Sunday. It was agreed that this should be done. Instead of that, on the following morning I received an apology from Captain Ogilvy for his conduct on that occasion. I heard no more of it until some weeks after, when he came a second time, and threatened me with the Bishop in such a manner that I had to retire into the house. For this he also apologised, and stated that henceforth we were to be as strangers, officially and socially."
To every word of this I am prepared, to stand.
I note that " D. Ogilvy " follows the leadership of the " District Medical Man " after this wise-" We have given this fellow a mortal stab, and not a word about it." Now, it may appear a very valiant thing in the eyes of members of the medical and military profession to accuse a defenceless man of lying, and then in the same breath decline any further correspondence on the subject ; but to my thinking it is uncommonly like something else. Not only so. It will appear, I fancy, to the heart of every honourable person immensely akin to garotting a man, and then making a run for it. This cannot go on, for accusations like these are clear cases for the Ecclesiastical Court, and to that we must appeal.
Lastly, I have only to add that, inasmuch as the letter about which I am said to lie has been in the Bishop's hands more than three months (a copy having been posted to " D. Ogilvy " on the day it was written), and, not an objection made against it until now, it is difficult to conceive any motive in your correspondent than that of driving the sting of the " shameful indignity " further into me.111



Samuel announced that the service at Richmond, Tasmania, on Sunday, 10 May 1874 would be conducted by Rev. Greene.112

In a move perhaps designed to show the Bishop's suport, Samuel acted as Bishop's Chaplain and bore the pastoral staff at a special choral service at St. David's Cathedral on 14 May 1874.113

In an editorial on Saturday, 16 May 1874, The Mercury stated that the "feuds between the pastors and certain members of their flock" had been "discussed at considerable length in our columns" but the "language used on either side at last became so virulent" that they closed their column to further letters.

He assisted with a Divine Service delivered in St. David's Cathedral on Wednesday, 24 February 1875, after a lecture on " The antiquity, independence, and characteristics of the English Church, historically considered," was delivered by the Bishop of Tasmania.114

He attended the annual session of the Diocesean Synod of Tasmania at the newly-opened St. David's Cathedral on Tuesday, 30 March 1875.115

His mother died 15 April 1875 at the age of 97. Samuel was aged 52 when this happened. Perhaps as a consequence of his mother's death, the papers recorded a decline in his health in early May 1875 saying "(t)his popular clergyman, among the humble classes, has been afflicted recently with illness, which his many friends will be glad to learn he is now recovering from."116



The Pauper's Burial


An anonymous correspondent was published in The Mercury on Wednesday, 9 June 1875 regarding recent events at Richmond, Tasmania:
Sir,-We are frequently told by teachers of religion and the Press, that we are living in the days of advanced Christianity, human progress, responsive sympathy, and refined civilisation. It may be true. Yet it is a fact that the poor young man who lost his life the other day in a gravel pit, at Lower Jerusalem, was buried in Richmond, last Sunday, "like a dog.',' He was taken out of the dead-house of the gaol in a shell, or rather, his mangled remains were taken, to the burial ground of the Church of England, and there the common grave digger performed his miserable part of lowering down and filling up. And not a soul to shed a tear of sympathy over the painful event. Report says the father of the young man was otherwise, and less properly employed, at the time, in Richmond. No bell tolled the young man's departure ; nor was the shadow of a burial service performed over his grave. It is but fair to say that the incumbent has been very seriously ill, and, although he has performed the services of marrying and burying during the past week, it might not have been safe for him to venture out on Sunday, as the day was cold aud damp. And the burying ground being consecrated, was a sufficient bar to any other minister to give any religious service therein.
Mr, Editor, I want you to think of this one fact in connection with the above. Here, in Richmond, the Church of England has five acres of burial ground; in the centre of this about two acres have been consecrated, and are used for burial; of the remainder, some is grazed, and some is actually let for tillage; whilst a few rods in the centre of the township is all that can be used by Independents, Baptists, Presbyterians, and Wesleyans and this ought to be closed for such purposes by the strong hand of the law. But there is no law. Why, then, should not part of the unconsccrated ground now grazed or let for tillage be set apart by the Government for the use of other denominations?
The common sense of the public, as well as justice, and the acknowledged equality of all religions in the broad eye of the law, demand imperatively that all the burial grounds in the country be thrown open to, at least, every minister of religion, especially in such a case as that of Richmond, where only one quarter of the ground, or little more, Is consecruted and used. If public burial grounds were open to any Christian man, in case of need, to read a short service over a poor man's grave, it is very likely the, dog-like burial of the young man last Sunday would not have taken place.
Yours, truly,
JUSTICE.117

However, it was revealed that Samuel was quite ill and staying in the Hobart suburb of New Town (some 25 km away) at the time and was unaware of the occurance.118

The original correspondent on this subject clarified his thinking in a letter published Monday, 14 June 1875, pivoting to criticise the place of the Church of England's placed in society:
SIR, -I am not sure that the two notices of my letter on the above painful subject in yours of the 10th, require any reply from me. No reflection was cast at all upon the incumbent of St. Luke's, as it was known and acknowledged that he had been seriously ill ; and it is as well known that he is an indefatigable worker for his church ; but his absence from home was not known until the appearance of Mr. Hudspeth's note. But even this does not cover the shameful event complained of.
And I do hope that the kind-hearted and venerable Archdeacon Davies will forgive me when I say that " Justice " has no complaint to make to the bishop or to himself. The subject is civil as well as ecclesiastical. And the chief complaint is against the Government of the country, both past and present. First. For granting - and it is only four, or five years ago since the grant was issued - five acres of land (I think it is more) just off the township, for the sole use of one church, and of which little more than a quarter is used for burial, the rest grazed or tilled! and no other minister of religion dare set his foot upon it for burial purposes. Is this equal laws and rights ? Is it civil and religious liberty ? Why is the miserable figment of consecration allowed to be sufficient to prevent other ministers than those of the Church of England from burying their own dead in public ground ? If the ground bad been held by the Presbyterian Church, the shocking and atheistical sight, witnessed on a Sunday in Richmond, of the burial of a young man " like a dog " would never have taken place, simply because the superstition of consecration would have had no existence ; and in case of illness or absence, any other, minister could have officiated at the grave.
Mr. Editor, Christianity is the only religion that sets forth, without the shadow of a doubt, the sublime doctrine of a Resurrection ; and it is only fitting and proper that in every Christian community this glorious truth should be proclaimed, by some disciple of our Lord Jesus Christ, over every yawning grave. If there be any meaning in a burial service at all, it is to stand forth then and there to witness for this divine and blessed truth. And the Government has no right to put a limit to this witnessing, which it virtually does, by granting public ground for the exclusive use of one church.
But, sir, there is another source of complaint. Why do the Government allow interments in the very heart of small townships, where roads and drainage are bad, where back yards, and other places, are bad, and where fevers are prevalent and fatal ? Naturally, Riohmond is one of the healthiest places in Tasmania. A kind Providence intended it to be so. There is a fall from every side of the township, and Coal River running nearly through the midst of it, and salt water within a quarter of a mile of the bridge. Sir, it was the natural beauty of the scenery of Richmond, and the sanctity of God's Sabbath, that made the vulgar and degrading burial of the young man so revolting to every refined and Christian feeling.119



A newspaper report on 26 June 1875 said he had been unfairly criticised in relation to the burial of a pauper in Richmond, Tasmania, and responded with an anecdote on 26 June 1875:
A person in humble circumstances was trying to get a horse with a laden cart up a slight incline, this the horse appeared to be unable to effect without some help, which was readily tendered by Mr. Fookes, who, though ill, helped with hands and shoulders, as well as his strength allowed him, to push the cart, and thus aid the horse up tbe hill. By this act one humble wayfarer was relieved, and sent on the road rejoicing and thankful for the assistance given. It is questionable whether Mr Moody or Mr Sankey, would condescend to stoop and act in this way in similar circumstances.120



In a letter to a newspaper on Wednesday, 30 June 1875, W. Griffith, the Police Superintendent made further remarks on the case:
Dear Sir, My attention has been drawn to the report of "Your own Correspondent " in issue of Saturday last, headed "Burial at Richmond," in which be states "the late attempt to cast odium on the Rev. W. Fookes, relative to a young man buried as a pauper in the Church of England ground at Richmond, utterly failed." "The attempt has only added to the estimation in which he is held by the people of the district."
Now, it is not my present desire or intention, to offer a single remark as to the truthfulness or value of the paneygric lavishly bestowed, upon the rev. gentleman ; it is sufficient for my purpose to point out that there was blame somewhere.
The circumstances attending the unfortunate lad's burial were these Immediately after the inquest at Lower Jerusalem, the body was removed in a chaise cart to Richmond, accompanied by the boy's father, and I sent a note asking the undertaker to endeavour 'to have the burial on the following day (Sunday) if possible. This was to enable the father to attend.
The next morning (Sunday) I was informed that the burial would take place at a quarter to 2 pirn. When that hour arrived the undertaker sent for the coffin, and then for the first time I learnt that there was no clergyman, to perform the last sad office at the grave. I was indignant, and immediately sent to the undertaker for an explanation, and received back an answer from him, that the sexton told him the Incumbent had left word that the body was to be taken to the grave and deposited therein, and on his return he would read the prayer over it; and it was in consequence of this message that it was done. I permitted the remains to be buried, as has been so aptly described, 'Like a dog."121



He was still struggling to overcome his "severe indisposition" on Tuesday, 6 July 1875, but had been able to perform a wedding at Jerusalem (now Colebook), Tasmania, the day before.122,123

Samuel responded in a letter published in the Tasmanian Tribune on Thursday, 8 July 1875:
Sir,— As a rule I think it is not necessary or wise to notice anonymous attacks in the public newspapers,- and-therefore I did not reply to certain letters in the Mercury under the signature of "Justice," having reference to the above case, but now that Mr John Griffith, the Superintendent of Police in this municipality has written to you on' the subject, I think it would be unbecoming in me to maintain silence any longer. Therefore, I request the favour of your inserting the following statement, in justice to myself, for it is now evident that the design is to cast the whole odium of the transaction on my shoulders. Rest and change being recommended to me, on Friday June 5th, I left home for a short visit to the Parsonage, at New Town, intending to return on the following day. In the morning I was seized with acute diarrhoea, which rendered me totally unfit to travel. Seeing my condition, Canon Hudspeth very kindly took the trouble to try and obtain a clergyman to supply my place on the coming Sunday, but without effect. According to the Coroner's warrant for the interment of the body of John Pearce, the' inquest was held on Friday, June 5th, and its' removal to Richmond, as I am told, took place on that evening, or on the following day. No intimation was conveyed to me until1 9 a.m. on Sunday, when the sexton left a message at my house that the funeral would take place at 2 p.m. Considering the distance and uncertainty of crossing Risdon Ferry, there was no time to communicate with me, even supposing I had been in a fit state to obey the summons. On Monday evening I recieved the first intelligence in the matter, and hastened home as soon as could be. When at the cemetery for the performance of the burial service, I found the grave closed, and then, and not before, told the sexton that at any future time, if from any cause, a body must be buried in the absence of a clergyman, the way would be to lower it into the grave, arid then cover it with slabs, which could he easily removed when the funeral rites we're celebrated.
In such circumstances, I do not feel myself justly blameworthy in any way or shape, because it is clear that if sufficient arid timely notice had been given to me, the whole thing would have been obviated. Mr, Griffith tells the public that, on hearing of my absence, be was indignant, whether with me, or with himself, as the manager, of the matter, does not appear. If with me, I beg permission to tell him that instead of rushing into print, the oniy legitimate way open to him, of venting his indignation, was to ask an explanation from me, and not from undertakers and other people, and if that were insufficient, make his formal-complaint to the Bishop, according to the invitation of the Archdeacon. I can bear the issue. Curiously enough, in looking over our burial register in days past, I came on the following entry for 1840: " These persons (5) buried during my illness in Hobart,"W. J. Aislanie, without, the name of any officiating minister. So that I am not the only holder of the cure who has been subject to the " ills that flesh is heir to.'" A long residence in Tasmania, is, I feel, quite sufficient to appeal to, in proof that I am utterly incapable of being party to such a disregard to sacred tllings, as these corrrespondents to the public press would wish people to believe.
And now, Sir, before, closing this, I wish to add a few words respecting the detestable system current now-a-days of watching for every opportunity, however trifling, that may occur, whereby the good name of the servants of the Most High may be ruthlessly sacrificed. This, I am grieved to say, appertains to Richmond in particular. Since my arrivall here, no amount of skilful detraction, vile insinuation, groundless charges of every description, were it penned in your pages, could in the least degree adequately express the contumely(?) that that has been heaped upon me. Only yesterday, a being calling himself a man, in the coarsest possible terms, threatened me with the Bishop, exposure in the newspapers, pains and penalties innumerable, on account of a transaction performed by one of my predecessors years before I took charge of the cure. This is all very well when a man has the health to stand it, because he, of all persons must be content to suffer, but to my thinking raillery and persecution in times of sicknesss are such gross acts of inhumanity, coupled with the rankest cowardice, as to be unworthy of the inhabitants of a civilised country. I am loth to appeal ad misericordiam , but in as much as there is no person here kindhearted enough to say to the disaffected, "Let the man have a chance to recover," I am compelled. The truth is, Sir, if it were possible to obtain a substitute, I would take the rest my medical adviser has imperatively ordered by written" message to the Bishop. It is not possible, and therefore now l do, of neccessity, ride long journeys and perform sacred offices after them, under indescribable agony from exhaustion. Surely, I may fairly claim to say that this is acting as a man, at all events, and all I ask of others is that they will attend to the divine command, "Go and do tbou likewise."124



A letter was published on 9 July 1875 which was critical of Samuel:
Sir, - in your issue of today appears a letter from the Rev. S. B. Fookes which I think calls for a few comments from me first, I am quite in accord with the rev. gentleman as regards the notice that should ordinarily be taken of anonymous newspaper correspondants, and hence my having the temerity (in rebutting what I consider a stigma attempted to be cast upon me) as having the (?) that the burial of the importunate lad Pearce, to sign my name to the letter in which I endeavoured to explain the circumstances connected with the matter, and in which I have yet to learn that I cast the slightest odium or blame upon the incumbent. I simply alleged that there was blame somewhere, and say so now, but certainly not with the police the inquest was held on Saturday the 6th ult. And in less than a quarter of an hour of its closing body was on its way to Richmond.
The Rev. Mr Fookes, in an attempt at facetiousness states "Mr Griffith tells the public that in hearing my absence, he was indignant, even with me or with himself, as the manager of the matter does not appear." In this he misquotes me. I made no mention in reference to Mr Fookes's absence, but simply stated, on hearing for the first time that at the hour appointed for the burial there was no clergyman, &c
in conclusion, permit me to assure the rev. Gentleman that I am incapable of attempting to act in the way he suggests in time of sickness, and, although smarting under what I consider a foul stigma, refrained from offering a simple explanation, in consequence of having heard that he was unwell, and was only forced into doing so through the abusive paragraphs of his quasi friend "your own correspondant."
With regard to ruthlessly sacrificing the servants of the Most High, whatever that may mean, I beg to observe that in my intercourse through life with Christian gentlemen it has ever, as I trust it always will be, of the kindest, but for any set of persons to attempt to glorify themselves is holding, being entrusted with any special attributes from the Deity, is in the present age an insult to common sense.
Yours Truly
J. Griffith

The editors responded that they were ending this issue, and suggested that Griffith was a person who would "cavil at every little thing."125

Samuel was the subject of an editorial in The Tasmanian Tribune on Monday, 12 July 1875 concerning the death of the pauper, Pierce:
... Rev, Mr. Fookes is spoken of by the people in the district ... as being very attentive to the poor and sick, not only, to, members of his own church, but also to others ... during the prevalence of typhoid,fever in Richmond, when many persons were afraid to enter the houses of the sick, the Rev. Mr. Fookes attended to sick, not only of his own church but that of some Dissenters, who were not visited by any clergyman and those persons are not forgetful of such noble conduct.



Rev. Samuel Berjew Fookes officiated at a pauper's funeral in October 1875 at Richmond, Tasmania; the newspapers lamented that there were only enough men present "to lower the coffin from the cart to the ground."126

It was reported in the papers on Friday, 19 November 1875 that one of Rev. Samuel Berjew Fookes's sons "E. Fookes" was hit in the eye at Richmond, Tasmania, with a piece of thrown china, and was likely to lose his sight.127

On Monday, 20 December 1875, Samuel was present for the ordination of Rev. Charles Andrew at St. David's Cathedral.128

Samuel attended the Church of England Diocesan Synod that began on 22 February 1876 at Hobart.129

A newspaper gave him some praise on in April 1876:
The Rev.Mr. Fookes is popular with the working classes. He gave a course of lentern lectures, which were better attended than for years past.130



A Mr. Wallhouse was assisting Samuel in the parish business at Richmond, Tasmania, but announced he was leaving in 30 June 1876 as his appointment was expiring. The newspaper reported that this was much regretted.131

On Thursday, 21 September 1876 he was one of a number of clergymen who assisted the Bishop of Tasmania in the ordination of several new ministers at St. David's Cathedral.

In was noted in a paper of October 1876 that "[I]t can hardly be expected that a gentleman at the Rev. Mr Fookes' time of life can be expected to undergo the fatigues incidental to his wide-spread pastoral charge."132

[The annual Christmas examination and presentation of prizes took place in the schoolroom at at Queen's Asylum Orphan School in the Hobart suburb of New Town on Thursday, 28 December 1876. There was a large attendance, despite the poor weather, including the Governor, the Inspector of Schools, the Attorney-General, the Bishop of Tasmania and others. The paper of the day gave a long report of the speeches and the marks obtained by the students. At the end of the day a feast was provided of buns, fruit of all sorts, lemonade and rasperry vinegar.133

He applied for and received the pension circa 1877:
"After some while gathering his strength he was engaged as curate at St. David's under the Rev. H. C. Garlick for some time, taking a special interest in the mission district; and when his services were no longer required there he assisted Canon Archer at All Saints', and took occasional services in some country parishes."10



It was noted that when he was incumbent at Richmond, Tasmania, he would only preach at Jerusalem every four weeks; the new incumbent would preach there weekly.134

The newspaper of the day reported that there was a large gathering of children and leading parishioners from the Sunday School.135

His poor health (and his determination) were alluded to in a newspaper report on 10 March 1877:
REV. MR FOOKES. This clergyman, belonging to the Church of England, whose visits to Jerusalam at stated periods are always looked forward to with gladness by his parishioners, it is said, makes this somewhat long visit under great difficulties and impaired health. It is considered that he should have the services of a curate to aid him in his extensive cure.136



A public meeting was held at the Council Chambers in Richmond, Tasmania, on whether to establish a library and reading room; the motion was agreed and Samuel found himself on the committee.137,138

In early May an unknown date he was appointed to a committee to determine rules for the library and reading room to be established at Richmond, Tasmania.139

Samuel attended a meeting at Richmond, Tasmania, on 14 August 1877 about obtaining a building for a public library; he proposed that the funds they collected bear interest to the contributors.140

On Thursday, 6 September 1877 he officiated at a wedding at Jerusalem (now Colebook), Tasmania.141

Samuel was appointed as a member of the school board at Lower Jerusalem (now Colebook), Tasmania, in December 1877.142

As a member of the local school board, he attended the examination of students at the public school at Jerusalem (now Colebook), Tasmania.143

A number of dignitaries and senior clergymen (including the Govenor, the Attorney-General and two Bishops) attended the presentation and giving of prizes at the New Town on Friday, 28 December 1877. The Govenor made a speech, noting the clean and healthy appearance of the children.144

He presided at a marriage at Richmond, Tasmania, on Thursday, 3 January 1878.145

Samuel opened a bazaar and gave a short address at the public library and reading room at Richmond, Tasmania, with the purpose of liquidating the debt of the library committee. The newspaper reported that Samuel "congratulated the inhabitants generally on the change that was perceptible in the building where they were assembled, which, in former years, was used for a very different purpose-viz., as a watchhouse for the incarceration of drunkards and such like".146,147 He officiated at the funeral of James Salmon at Jerusalem (now Colebook), Tasmania, on Thursday, 25 April 1878.148

He he wrote a long letter of complaint after he was punished when some of his cattle were allowed to graze in a public place, and were impounded.149

Samuel wrote a letter to The Mercury, published on Monday, 7 October 1878 on the Copping Case:
Sir,-It is with some hesitation that I ask you to insert this letter, not because the subject to which it relates is unworthy, but because it is well known that clergymen are commonly credited with such an amount of bias on the side of pity that their contributions to the Press frequently do not obtain that amount of attention from the public which they may legitimately deserve. Considerable intercourse with the criminal classes of this colony, and consequently considerable knowledge of the motives which lead to the commission of offences against the law, combined with a desire to relieve my own heart in the matter, may be my excuse.
It must, I submit, be allowed on all hands, that from, the time the unfortunate young man, Richard Copping, was apprehended for the commission of the crime for which he now lies under sentence of death, the greatest consideration, due to safe custody and vindication of the law, has been extended to him, and therefore I would not like to say a single word against the fairness of his trial or the justice of his sentence, according to evidence, up to the present time, because I could not. What I desire is to raise very humbly and respectfully, to all concerned in it, the question whether the information we have on the subject is sufficiently exhaustive to satisfy the minds of thoughtful men as to the sentence being carried out.
1. There is not the least ground for thinking that Copping contemplated the dreadful deed when he left his father's house on the fatal Sunday afternoon, or when up to the time of leaving his uncle's house and going into the yard, and therefore it may fairly be urged that the crime is not co-equal, in what is legally called malice prepense, with Farrel's attempt on the life of the Duke of Edinburgh, or the assassination of the late Earl of Leitri, or what used to be styled " the Greenacre Tragedy."
2. No doubt is entertained that some sort of altercation took place between the convict and his victim, and probably the young man himself is the only one who could testify to the provocation that may have been given. If, as is generally supposed, it took the form of threat to surrender him for some one else, then I think every means should be used to ascertain whether such things were frequent between them, and, also, whether he had been ever heard to threaten the girl's life. Really it is to my mind most pitiable that possibly the weak nature of this condemned one may have been rendered furious from jealousy. Next to our Blessed Lord, perhaps our own poet Shakespeare, has left us evidence of being the best judge of man the world has ever known. Let him speak (Othello Act 3, scene 3.)
" O Beware, my Lord, of jealousy,
It is the green-eyed monster, which doth make
The meat it feeds on."
" Trifles light as air,
Are, to the jealous, confirmations strongly
As proofs of holy writ."
" Dangerous conceits are, in their natures, poisons,
Which burn like the fumes of sulphur."
Lastly, I would urge that some little consideration, be it ever so little, is due on account of the culprit's youth. From what I have seen and heard of Copping, the impression is strong on my mind that he has been brought face to face with things that his imperfect faculties had hitherto never afforded him the means of grasping, either as to their terrible nature or their fearful consequences. Sane enough mentally, morally, and religiously, insane in the highest degree. Possibly this may not be his own fault altogether ; if so, he is not altogether responsible.150



He wrote a letter to the paper, published 15 October 1878 expressing his dismay at the possibility that a teenager might be executed for murder:
Sir, - in my opinion your correspondence "Justinian's" letter respecting the young man Richard Copping, now lying in the Hobart Town gaol under sentence of death for murder, failed to claim the attention it deserves on account of its having being published without the writer's real name being attached to it.
Anonymous productions on such a subject seldom reach the mark they aim at, (?) of the uncertainty in the public mind as to whether the position of the author is such as to stay an execution on arguments that may be produced. This before us is a matter of life and death (?) to be irrevocably decided, therefore there is no time to bandy words about signatures and such like. With your permission then I will join issue with your correspondent in all that he has said respecting the difference of opinion as to the prisoner's sanity, and that, as is usual in such cases over and over again repeated, the prisoner should have received the benefit of it. If the entire sentence of the law takes place, and I pray that it may be averted, the question 'who shall decide when disagree?' will be a problem no longer for it will have been solved by a Tasmanian jury, who probably know as much about the truce science of mental observation as you and I, Sir, know about the principle on which the circle may be squared. Sane or insane, I consider there are circumstances about this unhappy case which hitherto have not been exhaustively treated. The tragedy must have had some motive, and from the information before the public it is both inconceivable and inexplicable on many other than that of frenzy roused by real or supposed wrong. It is true that one of the witnesses at the trial stated that no disagreement took place between the prisoner and his sister on the day of their last meeting and there is no reason to suppose that she stated anything but what she believed to be true. But then it must be remembered that there is such a thing as an altercation by looks, without a single word being spoken, unobservable by anyone but those who engage in it. Such is often more galling and provoking than ever so much had been said. Again, the witness is very young, only 13, and the whole circumstances of the most trying nature, and as experience shows, after terrible shock to the minds of youth, reflection often exhibits a fact in a different light what it really was. Lapse of time too may have produced forgetfulness. It is simply incredible that nothing angry passed between the parties immediately concerned of an unfriendly character. Once more, the witnesses are relatives of the prisoner, and are said to have had a dislike to him for some time. This was objectionable in witnesses solely testifying to a crime if no family ties existed between them, but it seems much increased(?) by the latter fact. All the world knows how frequently it is next to impossible to heal the differences of those allied by blood and how bitter and lasting is the feeling of hatred. For my part, judging from the experiences of life, I should receive the evidence of relations at issue with the accused with the upmost possible caution, and as to assigning a youth like Copping to the scaffold or the like - it is our contingency to be deprecated, in my opinion, to the very utmost. Lastly, I have now in my mind's eye the case of the young harlot(?) who, a few years ago of malice afore-thought, so naturally and brutally led her own offspring to the brink of the Tamar, and he did not its (?) but steeled her heart against the yearnings of nature, and also that of the thrice-tried convict, Francis Shearan, for of daring feat found dead at the Huon. They both mercifully live, and is no compassion to be extended to Richard Copping? I am bold enough to say that (if) this execution takes place it will be another, and I trust, the last link in the chain of thought and feeling which is gradually but surely bringing an end to the point of agreement, that at this stage of the world it is neither proper, polite, nor wise, to deal with the youth in his teens, as to the matter of punishment for crime, in the same way as one would, and ought to, deal with heavy-handed sinner.151



A conformation service was held at Holy Trinity Church, in Hobart, on the evening of Wednesday, 27 November 1878 for 32 candidates; Samuel attended the service in which the congregants "heartily participated."152

A distribution of prizes was made at New Town on Saturday, 28 December 1878; a alarge number of people attended, including the Govenor and his wife, and Premier. His Excellency awarded prizes to the most outstanding of the children.153

He conducted a wedding at Richmond, Tasmania, on Wednesday, 5 March 1879.154

He attended the Diocesan Synod of Tasmania on Tuesday, 11 March 1879 that met at Town Hall, in Hobart. They reported that many of the unoccupied parishes were now filled, and the progress of the new cathederal.155

It was recognised in the paper on Wednesday, 23 July 1879 that Samuel was too ill to officiate at church, and had been for some time. Other clergymen had come from Hobart "to keep the church open."156
Samuel Berjew Fooks in later years


On the evening of Monday, 17 May 1880 at Perth, Tasmania, he chaired a Penny Reading. Later, amongst a number of musical selections, he recited "the report of an unjudged case" by Cowper, and a selection from Shakespeare.157

On the evening of Monday, 12 July 1880 at Perth, Tasmania, he chaired a silver reading in aid of the pianoforte fund.158

He resigned from the local school board at Lower Jerusalem (now Colebook), Tasmania, and Dulcot in late July 1880.159,160

The Hutchins Scool, in Hobart, had their annual meeting and distribution of prizes on the morning of Monday, 20 December 1880, attended by "friends, patrons and scholars" including Samuel. The Acting Govenor, Sir Henry Lefroy attended.161

On the evening of Thursday, 3 March 1881, Samuel attended the 3rd annual meeting of the Church Society for the diocese of Tasmania held at the schoolroom of St. David's Cathedral. The meeting was attended by many of Hobart's clergymen, politicians (including the governor).162 He helped officiate at the wedding of William Benson and his first wife's cousin Lucy Charlotte Westbrook at St. Mark's Church on Thursday, 2 June 1881 at the Hobart suburb of Bellerive, Tasmania.163,164

The ordination of two new priests took place on Tuesday, 20 December 1881 at St. David's Cathedral and Samuel was one of the ministers who took part in the ceremony.165

The foundation stone for the Sunday School at at St. John's in the Hobart suburb of New Town was laid on Thursday, 9 February 1882' he was one of the clergymen assisting the Bishop at the ceremony.166

He temporarily held Sunday services at St Andrew's, in Lefroy, Tasmania, north of Lauceston, for a couple of months whilst awaiting a new incumbent. The church had only opened four months ago, after the town didn't have an Anglican church for 8 years. The town seemed to react with dissatisfaction to Samuel's appointment; his age at 59 and ill-health seemed to at least some members of the township to be ill matched to the large size of the parish. He officiated at at least two funerals in this time. When Samuel was still preaching in May, the members of the parish reported feeling frustration at not seeing any sign of the new minister.167,168,169,170,171

It was reported that Samuel was ill for a few weeks in May 1882.170

Samuel was temporarily appointed to the Parish of North Dorset on 1 May 1882.172 He departed from Launceston, Tasmania, on 22 August 1882 on the s.s. Flinders for a visit to Melbourne.173,174

Samuel acted as locum tenens at Longford, Tasmania, for a few weeks in mid October 1882 whilst the regular minister was away.175

The new Bishop of Tasmania was consecrated in St. David's Cathedral on Wednesday, 25 April 1883 and Samuel was one of the clergymen who was present for the ceremony.176

On Friday, 7 September 1883 the church welcomed a new Bishop, Dr. Sandford with a day of festivities including a thanksgiving service at St. David's Cathedral attended by a large number of clergy, followed up by a meeting in the Synod Hall in Harrington Street that included Samuel.177

A floral service was held at St. David's Cathedral on the afternoon of Saturday, 15 December 1883, and Samuel was present. Many children attended from the Sunday schools and the Industrial School. The children, at a signal from the Dean, held bunches of flowers in the air and gracefully waved them. The flowrrs were subsequently given to the Hospital and the New Town Invalid Depot.178

Samuel was one of over a thousand people to attend a meeting at The Exhibition Building, in Hobart, to advance the cause of gospel temperance.179

He attended "a large and influential meeting" of the Blue Ribbon Movement, a movement with the aim of total abstinence from alcohol.180,181 On Thursday, 31 January 1884 he attended another crowded meeting of the Blue ribbbon Movement at Hobart. THis group was agasinst even moderate drinking, seeing it as but another form of drunkenness.182

In April 1884 the Incumbent and senior curate of St. David's Cathedral left for London, leaving Rev H. C. Hancock and Samuel as senior curate to administer the parish, assisted by several ministers without parishes. This situation extended for at least 9 months.183

He he attended a meeting of the Sunday School Association held at the schoolroom at St. David's Cathedral, chaired by the bishop.184

On a day marred by heavy rain, he attended the consecration of St. George's Cathedral, in Sorrell, Tasmania, on Thursday, 12 June 1884, along with a number of other clergymen. It must have been a bittersweet experience for him; the new church was built on the site of the original church, which had become dilapidated and unsafe, where his first wife was buried and her headstone remained..185,186

Samuel was one of a large number of people who was invited to Hobart on the morning of Wednesday, 2 July 1884 to meet the Governor.187

On the evening of Friday, 4 July 1884, Samuel was one of 19 members who attended a meeting of the St. David's club, held in the clubroom..188

On the evening of Wednesday, 16 July 1884, Samuel attended a meeting of the St. David's Church Society at the Harrington Street schoolroom, in Hobart, with the purpose of changing the way subscriptions for the parish were collected.189 Samuel Berjew Fooks Reid was named after his grandfather Rev. Samuel Berjew Fookes on 1 August 1884 at Deloraine, Tasmania.190

Samuel (and perhaps Louisa) attended the second quarterly social evening associated with the St. David's Club was held at Hobart on the evening of Wednesday, 20 August 1884. There were a number of musical selections given, as well as light supper; the group broke up at 10 o'clock by singing 'Auld Lang Syne.191'

Samuel attended and took part in a choral service at All Saint's Church, in Launceston, Tasmania, on the eve before All Saint's Day.192



The Ragged Schools
He attended the ceremony accompanying the distribution of prizes at Watchorn Street Ragged School, in Hobart, on the morning of Thursday, 18 December 1884. The rooms were decorated especially, thirty prizes were awarded, and some students "individually recited pieces of poetry in a very praiseworthy manner". Before the children left for Christmas holidays, "cakes and other sweets were handed round."193,194,195

The Lower Collins Street Ragged School, in Hobart, had a cermony for the giving of prizes at the end of the school year in 19 December 1884; he was present for this, as were a number of other ministers.196,197

Bishop Barry, The Metropolitan of Australia and Tasmania preached at St. David's Cathedral on the morning of Sunday, 11 January 1885; Samuel also officiated.198,199

A letter was written to The Mercury complaining that too many priests officiated at the sermons at St. David's Cathedral, and that the church would be better served if they went to the parishs. The notition received a strong response from an anonymous correspondent who thought:
If there be any cause for complaint, it is in the fact that the worthy incumbent is overworked. On several occasions lately he has had no assistance whatever on Sundays. Four services, often two sermons, baptisms, Sunday-school work, etc., is too much for a man in ill-health. But nobody takes the trouble to seek to help him, and there are many ways in which the male members, particularly, of the congregation might help.
In conclusion, the question is often asked, " How is it that we can't get a Dean ?" The answer I heard a visitor to Tasmania give, and in which I fully concur, was, "You have the reputation of being one of the most turbulent, vicious, and thick-headed congregations with which a minister has to deal. Yon expect to get a first-class man to do the work of half-a-dozen for a small salary ; you won't allow yourselves to be taught; and you abuse your teacher to your heart's content. That's the reason why you can't get a Dean." Very true; overworked, underpaid, and abused. Let us be warned in time.200



Samuel attended a service delivered by the Primate of Australia and Bishop of Sydney, Dr. Barry on St. David's Cathedral. The primate's service primarliy dealth with the role of the Church in society, especially in battling the attraction of worship of either nature and humanity.201

The Sunday Schools associated with St. David's celebrated their annual 'treat' on Tuesday, 10 February 1885. The 350 students involved met at the Victoria Street schoolroom, in Hobart, and:
marched in procession with banners and flags to the railway station, end after being safely packed in the train were conveyed to Brighton where they stayed for one hour [the visit was shortened due to bad weather], enjoying races and games on the banks of the Jordan, being supplied with refreshments meanwhile. They then returned to town and marched back to the schoolroom where they enjoyed a good tea and, after a short time spent in games, dispersed.202



Samuel attended the second annual meetiong of the St. David's club in the evening of Friday, 6 March 1885. The club was going well; if had grown by 25 members to a total of sixty now.203

He attended the third session of the ninth Synod of the Diocese of Tasmania at the Hobart on Tuesday, 28 April 1885. It was attended by 52 lay members and 64 clergymen.204

He attended the church Synod in May 1885.205

In June 1885 he was elected to the committee of the Ragged Schools Association.206

St. David's Mission Church Campbell Street, in Hobart, opened on the morning of Sunday, 12 July 1885 at 7:30 with the celebration of Holy Communion; Samuel acted in the role of deacon, and Grace played the organ at evensong that night (but was not accorded that honour for the ceremony itself).207,208,209 Rev. Samuel Berjew Fookes officiated at the wedding of James Sutherland Babbington and his daughter Grace Fookes at St. David's Mission Church Campbell Street on Wednesday, 12 August 1885 at Hobart.210,211,212,22

On the eve of Advent on 25 November 1885, Samuel participated in a special united service of Intercession at St. David's Cathedral where Anglican congregations around the world participated in unison.213,214

In the afternoon of Friday, 18 December 1885 he attended the distribution of prizes to the City School, in Hobart, and Samuel:
"in a very happy introductory address, urged the boys to cultivate those qualities which would, by-and-bye, when they became men, enable them to do something in the world, and to be all that was scholarly and good."215



At the annual distribution of prizes for the Cascade Road Ragged School, in Hobart, Samuel's attended; it was reported that the school was beautifully decorated with flowers and garlands.216

Samuel attended the ordination of his son-in-law James Sutherland Babbington at St. David's Cathedral on the morning of Sunday, 20 December 1885.217

Samuel as honorary secretary attended the annual examinations of the Hobart on the afternoon of Monday, 21 December 1885. The children were put through examinations, and demonstated their skills at "recitations, songs and dialogues".218,219

On Monday, 21 December 1885 Samuel and Louisa attended the Hobart as prizes were distributed.220,221

A harvest thanksgiving service was held at St. David's Cathedral on the night of Tuesday, 4 May 1886, drawing a crowded congregation. Samuel was one of the officiating clergymen.222

Both Samuel and Louisa attended the winter distribution of clothes at Hobart on the morning of Friday, 11 June 1886.223

Samuel was honorary secretary of the Ragged Schools Association, and attended the 28th annual general meeting at Hobart Town Hall, in Hobart, chaired by the Mayor. It was reported that there were 548 children on the rolls. Samuel opened the meeting, reading a short piece of scripture after which the children recited the Lord's Prayer. he later read the annual report. In the reports of the individual schools, it was reported that donations of clothing were made to the schools, but that the female students regularly made garments. In fact, the number of garments made that year was considered low as the girls were learning more advanced forms of needlework including button-hole making. However, it was also stated that the level of instruction given to the students was "not one whit inferior, as far as the standard was concerned, to that imparted in the best schools in the city."224,225

He attended the annual break-up of the Hobart on 21 December 1886. At one point some food was brought out:
A tray of buns was deposited in the room for the juveniles’ especial benefit, and when Mr Fookes asked them what they were, they all shouted with one accord, “Buns," and on being questioned further as to what they were there for they with considerable readiness said ‘Us, which excited the visible faculties of the visitors.226



He he attended the annual exhibition and distribution of prizes at Hobart on the morning of Tuesday, 21 December 1886; the children were "exercised in reading, singing and recitations in which they very creditably acquitted themselves."227,228

The Hobart held their Christmas break-up; he attended to see the children "turned up in their neatest and their best."229

He officiated a wedding at All Saint's Church, in Hobart, Tasmania, on 19 January 1887.230

On the occasion of the Queen's Jubilee, "a day of national rejoicing", he along with "a throng of worshippers" attended an early morning service at St. David's Cathedral.231

He attended a prize-giving day at Hobart on afternoon of Friday, 15 July 1887, where 145 students attended. Samuel read some scripture and engaged in prayer. The Governor's wife also attended, and spoke to the students on the important of conduct.232

The annual meeting of the Ragged School Association was held in the Mayors Courtroom at the Hobart, and Samuel attended. Many of the 523 children on the rolls attended, and sung a hymn to open the proceedings. In the meeting it was expressed that: "that whatever had a tendency to benefit man merited the support of man" and that "(m)ental ignorance was a moral degradation" whilst "higher education a great moral blessing". It was noted that the schools did not use trained teachers, but then, the State Schools had no recognised standards of teachers either.233

On the evening of Tuesday, 29 November 1887, the annual united service of intercession on behalf of Missions to the Heathen took place at St. David's Cathedral, attended by the Bishop and the choristors of All Saints, St. John's and St. David's. Samuel read the first lesson.234

The Hobart held their Christmas breakup on Tuesday, 20 December 1887; Samuel attended and amongst the giving of prizes and the presentation of entertainments, quizzed the students on their knowledge of geography and scripture.235,236

In the afternoon of Tuesday, 20 December 1887 he presided over the annual prize giving of the Hobart.237

The annual meeting of the Ragged School Association was held at Hobart on Tuesday, 29 May 1888; Samuel was the honorary secretary and offered "devotional exercises". The school was successfully helping hundreds of children; however the meeting also acknowledged that the name of the school helped keep numbers down, whilst hoping for the establishment of general free education.238

He performed a wedding at Buckland, Tasmania, on Thursday, 9 August 1888.239

The Anglican Synod was held in Hobart on Wednesday, 28 November 1888, and Samuel attended. The meeting dealth with some quite controversial items, including whether to appoint an administrator in the absence of the Bishop. Samuel voted for the Dean to fulfill the office of administrator, but the motion was not successful and the Archdeacon was to act as the administrator.240,241,242

On 18 December 1888 Samuel and Louisa distributed prizes to the 150 students present at Hobart on the day.243,244

He assisted with the giving of prizes at Hobart on the morning of 19 December 1888 when several recitations were given. Samuel "thanked those friends who were present for the warm interest they took in the progress of the school". he wished them well for Christmas, and hoped that they would return with new ardour in the new year.245,246

He remained in his role of honourary secretary of the Ragged Schools Association in August 1889, despite not being at the annual general meeting.247,248

In early October 1889 he resigned his position ast the secretary of the Ragged Schools Association, a position he had held for many years.249,250

Samuel officiated at the Christmas service at Buckland, Tasmania, (standing in for the incumbent; Louisa helped with the decorations. This was the church that he had married his first wife 42 years earlier.251,252253
Samuel Berjew Fook's headstone
(Source: Dionald Reid)
Samuel (and presumably his spouse Louisa) lived in 1890 at Princes Street West on the south side between Kingston Road and Grosvenor Street, in Hobart.254

He resigned as the Honorary Secretary of the Ragged Scools association after 4 years of service.255

In mid April 1891, Samuel attended the Diocesan Synod, and multi-day event. he seconded a petition calling for the restoration of the old Parish of Perth. The motion was carried.256,257,258 Samuel (and presumably his spouse Louisa) lived in 1892 at Hobart.259

Samuel died on 2 November 1892 at Sandy Bay, Hobart, at age 70 after a long illness.10,1,86 His body was interred at Queensborough Cemetery at Sandy Bay, Hobart. The cemetery has since been converted to Schoolgrounds for the Hutchins School. Some headstones were preserved and erected in a little park in Peel Street, Sandy Bay. The headstone of Samuel Fookes, his second wife Louisa Jean Hobkirk and others of his second family are amongst those preserved in the Peel Street site. The headstone of the Westbrook family, including Samuel Westbrook is preserved in the same park..260,86

Timeline

DateEventPlace
Family
1822BirthWeymouth, Dorset1,2
1822BaptismMelcombe Regis, Weymouth, Dorset3
1841OccupationSouth Australia2,10
Name Change2
1842Passngr-depart-hide261,262
1842Note memo only CR CRHobart11
1842Note memo only CR CR12
EmploymentHobart2,10,13
EmploymentRichmond, Tasmania5,10
EmploymentSpring Bay, Tasmania2
Note memo only CR CR14
1845Note memo only CR CR2 Barrack Street, in Hobart11,16,17
1846Note memo only CR CR18
1847OccupationSt. Lukes Anglican, in Richmond, Tasmania19
1847MarriageSt. John the Baptist, in Buckland, Tasmania20,21,22
1847Note memo only CR CRThe Lennox Arms Hotel, in Hobart23
Employment14,10
1848Note memo only CR CRSt. David's old Cathedral, in Hobart24,25,26,14,11
1849Note memo only CR CRGovernment House, in Hobart27
1850Quotation type 1Jerusalem (now Colebook), Tasmania28
1850Note CR CR29,30
1851Note memo only CR CRImpression Bay (now Premaydena), Tasman Penninsula, Tasmania11
1852Employment-hidePort Arthur, Tasmania14
1852Note memo only CR CRImpression Bay (now Premaydena), Tasman Penninsula, Tasmania31,32
1852Note memo only CR CR33
1852Note memo only CR CR34
1854ResidenceImpression Bay (now Premaydena), Tasman Penninsula, Tasmania35
1854Occupation36
Note memo only CR CR38,14
1854Note CR CRSt. Paul's, in Circular Head, Tasmania39,40,11
1854Note memo only CR CRThe Chapel, in Forest, Tasmania41
1854Note memo only CR CR42
1855Residence-hideThe parsonage, in Stanley, Tasmania40
1855MarriageTrinity Church, in Launceston, Tasmania43,44,45
1855Note memo only CR CR46
1857Note memo only CR CRCircular Head, Tasmania47
1857Note memo only CR CRSt. Matthias, in Windermere, Tasmania11
1857Note memo only CR CRCircular Head, Tasmania48
1858Note memo onlyWindermere, Tasmania10
1861Note memo only CR CRSt. Andrew's Anglican, in Perth, Tasmania11
1861ResidenceColebrook Dale, Tasmania49
1864Note10
1870Note memo only CR CRBreadalbane, Tasmania50,51
1870Note memo only CR CRPerth, Tasmania52
1870Note memo only CR CR at Municipal Council Chamber in the small Tasmanian town of Evandale53
1870Note memo only CR CRthe small Tasmanian town of Evandale54
1870Note memo only CR CRTemperence Hall, in Perth, Tasmania55
1870Note memo only CR CRPerth, Tasmania56
1870Note memo only CR CRBreadalbane, Tasmania57
1871Note memo only CR CRSt. John's, in Launceston, Tasmania58
1871Note memo onlyElizabeth Street schoolroom, in Launceston, Tasmania59,60
1871Note memo only CR CRLaunceston, Tasmania61,62
1871Note memo only CR CREvandale63
1871Note memo only CR CRSt. Paul's Anglican Church, in Launceston, Tasmania64
1871Quotation type 365
1871Quotation type 366,67
1871Note memo only CR CRLaunceston, Tasmania68
1871Quotation type 3Evandale69,70
1872OccupationSt. Luke's, in Richmond, Tasmania11,10
1872Note memo only CR CRPerth, Tasmania71,72
1872Quotation type 3Stanley, Tasmania73
1872Note memo only CR CRBreadalbane, Tasmania74
1872Note memo only CR CRPerth, Tasmania75
1872Note memo only CR CR at St. Andrew's new Anglican church in the small Tasmanian town of Evandale76
1872Note memo only CR CRBreadalbane, Tasmania77,78
1872Occupation82
1872Note memo only CR CRPerth, Tasmania82,91
1873Note memo onlyRichmond, Tasmania92
1873Note memo only CR CRJerusalem (now Colebook), Tasmania93
1873Note memo only CR CRSt. John's, in Hobart94,95
1874Note memo only CR CRSt. David's new Cathedral, in Hobart96
1874Quotation type 3Council Chambers, in Richmond, Tasmania97,98
1874Note memo only CR CRRichmond, Tasmania99
1874Note memo only CR CRRichmond, Tasmania100
1874Quotation type 3Richmond, Tasmania101
1874Note memo only102
1874Quotation type 2103
1874Quotation type 2104
1874Note memo only CR CRRichmond, Tasmania105,106
1874Quotation type 3Richmond, Tasmania107
1874Quotation type 2108
1874Quotation type 3109
1874Quotation type 3110
1874Quotation type 3111
1874Note memo only CR CRRichmond, Tasmania112
1874Note memo only CR CRSt. David's Cathedral113
1874Note memo only CR CR
1875Note memo only CR CRSt. David's Cathedral114
1875Note memo only CR CRSt. David's Cathedral115
1875Note memo only116
1875Quotation type 3Richmond, Tasmania117
1875Note memo onlythe Hobart suburb of New Town118
1875Quotation type 3119
1875Quotation type 2Richmond, Tasmania120
1875Quotation type 3121
1875Note memo only CR CRJerusalem (now Colebook), Tasmania122,123
1875Quotation type 3124
1875Quotation type 3125
1875Quotation type 3
1875Passngr-arrive-hideHobart263
1875Note memo only CR CRRichmond, Tasmania126
1875Note memo only CR CRRichmond, Tasmania127
1875Note memo only CR CRSt. David's Cathedral128
1876Note memo only CR CRHobart129
1876Quotation type 2130
1876Note memo only CR CRRichmond, Tasmania131
1876Note memo only CR CRSt. David's Cathedral
1876Note memo only CR CR132
1876Note memo only CR CR at Queen's Asylum Orphan School in the Hobart suburb of New Town133
1877Quotation type 210
1877Note memo only CR CRRichmond, Tasmania134
1877Note memo only CR CR135
1877Quotation type 2136
1877Note memo only CR CRRichmond, Tasmania137,138
Note memo only CR CRRichmond, Tasmania139
1877Note memo only CR CRRichmond, Tasmania140
1877Note memo only CR CRJerusalem (now Colebook), Tasmania141
1877Note memo only CR CRLower Jerusalem (now Colebook), Tasmania142
Note memo only CR CRJerusalem (now Colebook), Tasmania143
1877Note memo only CR CRNew Town144
1878Note memo only CR CRRichmond, Tasmania145
1878Note memo only CR CRRichmond, Tasmania146,147
1878Note memo onlyJerusalem (now Colebook), Tasmania148
1878Note memo only CR CR149
1878Quotation type 3150
1878Quotation type 3151
1878Note memo only CR CRHoly Trinity Church, in Hobart152
1878Note memo only CR CRNew Town153
1879Note memo only CR CRRichmond, Tasmania154
1879Note memo only CR CRTown Hall, in Hobart155
1879Note memo only CR CRRichmond, Tasmania156
1880Note memo only CR CRPerth, Tasmania157
1880Note memo only CR CRPerth, Tasmania158
1880Note memo only CR CRLower Jerusalem (now Colebook), Tasmania159,160
1880Note memo only CR CRHutchins Scool, in Hobart161
1881Note memo only CR CRSt. David's Cathedral162
1881Note memo only CR CRSt. David's Cathedral165
1882Note memo only CR CR at St. John's in the Hobart suburb of New Town166
1882Note memo only CR CRSt Andrew's, in Lefroy, Tasmania167,168,169,170,171
1882Note memo only CR CR170
1882Note memo only CR CR172
1882Passngr-departLaunceston, Tasmania173,174
1882Note memo only CR CRLongford, Tasmania175
1883Note memo only CR CRSt. David's Cathedral176
1883Note memo only CR CRSt. David's Cathedral177
1883Note memo only CR CRSt. David's Cathedral178
1884Note memo only CR CRThe Exhibition Building, in Hobart179
1884Note memo only CR CRHobart180,181
1884Note memo onlyHobart182
1884Note memo only CR CRSt. David's Cathedral183
1884Note memo only CR CRSt. David's Cathedral184
1884Note memo only CR CRSt. George's Cathedral, in Sorrell, Tasmania185,186
1884Note memo only CR CRHobart187
1884Note memo only CR CR188
1884Note memo only CR CRHarrington Street schoolroom, in Hobart189
1884Note memo only CR CRHobart191
1884Note memo only CR CRAll Saint's Church, in Launceston, Tasmania192
1884Note memo onlyWatchorn Street Ragged School, in Hobart193,194,195
1884Note memo only CR CRLower Collins Street Ragged School, in Hobart196,197
1885Note memo only CR CRSt. David's Cathedral198,199
1885Quotation type 3St. David's Cathedral200
1885Note memo only CR CRSt. David's Cathedral201
1885Quotation type 3Victoria Street schoolroom, in Hobart202
1885Note memo only CR CR203
1885Note memo only CR CRHobart204
1885Note memo only CR CR205
1885Note memo only CR CR206
1885Note memo only CR CRSt. David's Mission Church Campbell Street, in Hobart207,208,209
1885Note memo only CR CRSt. David's Cathedral213,214
1885Quotation type 3City School, in Hobart215
1885Note memo only CR CRCascade Road Ragged School, in Hobart216
1885Note memo only CR CRSt. David's Cathedral217
1885Note memo only CR CRHobart218,219
1885Note memo only CR CRHobart220,221
1886Note memo only CR CRSt. David's Cathedral222
1886Note memo only CR CRHobart223
1886Note memo only CR CRHobart Town Hall, in Hobart224,225
1886Quotation type 3Hobart226
1886Note memo only CR CRHobart227,228
1886Note memo only CR CRHobart229
1887Note memo only CR CRAll Saint's Church, in Hobart, Tasmania230
1887Note memo only CR CRSt. David's Cathedral231
1887Note memo only CR CRHobart232
1887Note memo only CR CRHobart233
1887Note memo only CR CRSt. David's Cathedral234
1887Note memo only CR CRHobart235,236
1887Note memo only CR CRHobart237
1888Note memo only CR CRHobart238
1888Note memo only CR CRBuckland, Tasmania239
1888Note memo only CR CRHobart240,241,242
1888Note memo only CR CRHobart243,244
1888Note memo only CR CRHobart245,246
1889Note memo only CR CRHobart247,248
1889Note memo only CR CR249,250
1889Note memo only CR CRBuckland, Tasmania251,252
1890ResidencePrinces Street West on the south side between Kingston Road and Grosvenor Street, in Hobart254
1890Note memo only CR CR255
1891Note memo only CR CR256,257,258
1892ResidenceHobart259
1892DeathSandy Bay, Hobart10,1,86
BurialQueensborough Cemetery, in Sandy Bay, Hobart260,86

Family 1

Margaret Sarah Westbrook (13 Sep 1822-11 Jun 1854)
Children

Family 2

Louisa Jean Hobkirk (10 Sep 1833-5 Dec 1918)
Children

Citations

  1. [S806] Jane Fookes,"Extract from Jane Fookes' bible," Bible extract, vital dates , n.d.. Currently held by unknown repository, unknown repository address (for date).
  2. [S274] Grahame R. Fooks, The Fooks Family Records p.5.
  3. [S338] Ancestry.com.au Ancestry.com, (http://www.ancestry.com.au/) Dorset History Centre; Dorset Parish Registers; Reference: PE/MCR.
  4. [S561] Dorset Online Parish Clerks (http://www.opcdorset.org/) http://www.opcdorset.org/CerneAbbasFiles/…
  5. [S274] Grahame R. Fooks, The Fooks Family Records p.4.
  6. [S1217] Oz Ships - Australian shipping 1788-1968 (http://www.ozships.net/) 'Waterloo' - 5/7/1840 to 9/11/1840 http://www.ozships.net/ozships/events/2/171.htm#10449 (The family's name is transcribed as 'Tooks').
  7. [S386] South Australian Migrant Shipping (1836-1860) (http://members.iinet.net.au/~perthdps/shipping/mig-sa1.htm) Waterloo 9th Nov 1840 (This citation is for the date and details of the ship; the presence of the Fooks family on it has not been verified.).
  8. [S256] Grahame R. Fooks, The Fooks Family, 1780-1980 p.4.
  9. [S1216] The South Australian Record and Australasian and South African Chronicle, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia, 1840 'SHIPWRECK.—LOSS OF THE BARQUE LANCIER.', South Australian Record and Australasian and South African Chronicle (SA : 1840 - 1841), 18 July, p. 7. , viewed 22 Nov 2020, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article245932986
  10. [S572] The Mercury (Hobart), Hobart, Tasmania, Australia, 1892 'OBITUARY.', The Mercury (Hobart, Tas. : 1860 - 1954), 3 November, p. 2, viewed 24 September, 2012, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article13300088
  11. [S728] GEDCOM file created by Donald L. Reid, 17 Feb 2014 (companion to 'Descendents of James MCKENZIE.rtf' p.7).
  12. [S570] The Courier (Hobart), Hobart, Tasmania, 1842 'SUPREME COURT—CRIMINAL SITTINGS.', The Courier (Hobart, Tas. : 1840 - 1859), 16 December, p. 2. , viewed 21 Nov 2020, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2953430
  13. [S570] The Courier (Hobart), Hobart, Tasmania, 1844 'Classified Advertising', The Courier (Hobart, Tas. : 1840 - 1859), 19 January, p. 3. , viewed 22 Nov 2020, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2951577
  14. [S274] Grahame R. Fooks, The Fooks Family Records p.6.
  15. [S570] The Courier (Hobart), Hobart, Tasmania, 1845 'Classified Advertising', The Courier (Hobart, Tas. : 1840 - 1859), 7 January, p. 1. , viewed 22 Nov 2020, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2950053
  16. [S570] The Courier (Hobart), Hobart, Tasmania, 1845 'Classified Advertising', The Courier (Hobart, Tas. : 1840 - 1859), 11 January, p. 1. , viewed 22 Nov 2020, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2949993
  17. [S638] The Colonial Times (Hobart), Hobart, Tasmania, Australia, 1845 'Advertising', Colonial Times (Hobart, Tas. : 1828 - 1857), 4 January, p. 1. , viewed 22 Nov 2020, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article8755893
  18. [S570] The Courier (Hobart), Hobart, Tasmania, 1846 'Classified Advertising', The Courier (Hobart, Tas. : 1840 - 1859), 25 November, p. 1. , viewed 22 Nov 2020, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2944386
  19. [S276] Westbrooks (http://www.vintners.net/~mikel/family/westbroo.html).
  20. [S273] Tasmania, Marriage Certificate, 1847#1400 (Index only).
  21. [S728] GEDCOM file created by Donald L. Reid, 17 Feb 2014 (companion to 'Descendents of James MCKENZIE.rtf' p.3) (for exact place and minister).
  22. [S569] Victor Malham,"Descendents of Samuel Brejew Fookes, Rev.PDF," , 23rd March 2012. Currently held by Tim Hill's collection, e-mail address page 1.
  23. [S570] The Courier (Hobart), Hobart, Tasmania, 1847 'PUBLIC MEETING AT RICHMOND AGAINST THE IMPORTATION OF SYDNEY CONVICTS.', The Courier (Hobart, Tas. : 1840 - 1859), 10 November, p. 2. , viewed 22 Nov 2020, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2970548
  24. [S570] The Courier (Hobart), Hobart, Tasmania, 1856 'MEANDER.', The Courier (Hobart, Tas. : 1840 - 1859), 22 April, p. 3. , viewed 22 Nov 2020, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2502408
  25. [S810] The Cornwall Chronicle, Launceston, Tasmania, 1848 'HOBART TOWN.', The Cornwall Chronicle (Launceston, Tas. : 1835 - 1880), 23 September, p. 43. , viewed 22 Nov 2020, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article65981281
  26. [S570] The Courier (Hobart), Hobart, Tasmania, 1848 'LOCAL.', The Courier (Hobart, Tas. : 1840 - 1859), 23 September, p. 2. , viewed 22 Nov 2020, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2968049
  27. [S638] The Colonial Times (Hobart), Hobart, Tasmania, Australia, 1849 'THE QUEEN'S BIRTH-DAY.', Colonial Times (Hobart, Tas. : 1828 - 1857), 25 May, p. 3. , viewed 22 Nov 2020, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article8765003
  28. [S638] The Colonial Times (Hobart), Hobart, Tasmania, Australia, 1850 'LOCAL.', The Courier (Hobart, Tas. : 1840 - 1859), 2 February, p. 3. , viewed 21 Nov 2020, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2963728
  29. [S638] The Colonial Times (Hobart), Hobart, Tasmania, Australia, 1852 'COLONIAL TIMES AND TASMANIAN.', Colonial Times (Hobart, Tas. : 1828 - 1857), 17 August, p. 2, viewed 10 July, 2013, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article8771937 ("THE following petition was adopted by the ministers of the Anglican Church :
    To her Most Gracious Majesty, Victoria, by the grace of God, Queen, &c, &.
    The humble petition of the undersigned, the bishop, archdeacons, and clergymen of the
    United Church of England and Ireland in Tasmania.
    RESPECTFULLY SHEWETH,
    That the appalling evils resulting from transportation to this island, as respects its moral and social condition, have, during several years past, been strenuously urged upon the imperial parliament, in a series of petitions from the colonists, including ministers of religion of all denominations, addressed to your Majesty and both houses of parliament, praying for its immediate and total abolition.
    That they have learned with deep regret, that a despatch has been received from the right honorable the secretary of state, announcing the intention of the government to resume transportation to this island, and to make a permanent penal colony.
    That this announcement has been received with grief, and alarm by a very large proportion of all classes of the community, and if criminals continue to be transported to this colony, your Majesty's petitioners, as ministers of peace, cannot but tremble at the permanent establishment of a spirit of exasperation, and of most unhappy division pervading the entire social system, seriously impeding the efforts of your Majesty's petitioners to promote the extension and continuance of Christian peace and love, according to their appointed duty.
    That for these reasons, as well as on account of the moral and social evils inherent in the very establishment of a penal colony, and of the degradation attached to it in the opinion of mankind at large, and of the injury thus sustained in point of character and reputation by the settlers in every such colony, your Majesty's petitioners are firmly convinced that, even supposing a lucrative return to be derived from convict labor, THAT advantage would be beyond calculation outweighed by the frightful evils which the convict system introduces and implants wherever the employment of such labor is admitted
    Your Majesty's petitioners also respectfully submit, that whatever might be the extent of the evils arising from a penal establishment in a community unanimously favorable to its continuance, there can be no doubt that those evils would be most formidably aggravated in a colony, where the majority of all classes are opposed to its resumption, and Your Majesty's petitioners hesitate not to declare their conviction, that convicts can no longer be introduced into this colony with real advantage to themselves, or to the community into which they are introduced.
    Your Majesty's petitioners therefore, being moved by these considerations, the serious nature of which cannot fail to force itself upon the notice of your Majesty, would, on their own behalf, and on the behalf of those for whom they are placed in charge, earnestly pray that your Majesty will be pleased, by and with the advice of your Majesty's privy council, to rescind the order by which the colony of Van Diemen's Land is declared to be a place to which criminals may be transported.
    And your Majesty's petitioners, as in duty bound, will ever pray, &c.").
  30. [S638] The Colonial Times (Hobart), Hobart, Tasmania, Australia, 1852 'COLONIAL TIMES AND TASMANIAN.', Colonial Times (Hobart, Tas. : 1828 - 1857), 17 August, p. 2. , viewed 22 Nov 2020, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article8771937
  31. [S570] The Courier (Hobart), Hobart, Tasmania, 1852 'LOCAL.', The Courier (Hobart, Tas. : 1840 - 1859), 7 July, p. 3. , viewed 21 Nov 2020, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2958794
  32. [S810] The Cornwall Chronicle, Launceston, Tasmania, 1852 'Registry of Tasmania.', The Cornwall Chronicle (Launceston, Tas. : 1835 - 1880), 10 July, p. 440. , viewed 22 Nov 2020, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article65579099
  33. [S565] The Launceston Examiner, Launceston, Tasmania, Australia, 1852 'ROYAL SOCIETY OF VAN DIEMEN'S LAND.', Launceston Examiner (Tas. : 1842 - 1899), 24 July, p. 4. (AFTERNOON), viewed 22 Nov 2020, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article36263658
  34. [S570] The Courier (Hobart), Hobart, Tasmania, 1852 'Classified Advertising', The Courier (Hobart, Tas. : 1840 - 1859), 27 October, p. 4. , viewed 22 Nov 2020, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2958283
  35. [S728] GEDCOM file created by Donald L. Reid, 17 Feb 2014 (companion to 'Descendents of James MCKENZIE.rtf' p.20).
  36. [S570] The Courier (Hobart), Hobart, Tasmania, 13 06 1854 p.2.
  37. [S276] Westbrooks (http://www.vintners.net/~mikel/family/westbroo.html) http://www.vintners.net/~mikel/family/westbroo.html
  38. [S570] The Courier (Hobart), Hobart, Tasmania, 1854 'General Intelligence.', The Courier (Hobart, Tas. : 1840 - 1859), 2 September, p. 2. , viewed 22 Nov 2020, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2241315
  39. [S820] Betty Jones unknown short book title Allotment 33.
  40. [S565] The Launceston Examiner, Launceston, Tasmania, Australia, 1857 '3. SALARIES.', Launceston Examiner (Tas. : 1842 - 1899), 28 November, p. 3 Edition: AFTERNOON, viewed 24 October, 2014, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article36303109
  41. [S1224] Central Queensland Family History Association Inc. (https://www.churchesoftasmania.com/) No. 789 - Forest - St Peter's Anglican Church - "The English Church in the Forest" https://www.churchesoftasmania.com/2020/10/…
  42. [S570] The Courier (Hobart), Hobart, Tasmania, 1854 'NARRATIVE OF THE LORD[?]BISHOP OF TASMANIA'S MISSIONARY CRUISE.', The Courier (Hobart, Tas. : 1840 - 1859), 9 December, p. 3. , viewed 21 Nov 2020, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2241497
  43. [S273] Tasmania, Marriage Certificate, 1855 #780 (index only).
  44. [S638] The Colonial Times (Hobart), Hobart, Tasmania, Australia, 1855 'Family Notices.', Colonial Times (Hobart, Tas. : 1828 - 1857), 17 May, p. 2, viewed 24 October, 2014, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article8780424
  45. [S728] GEDCOM file created by Donald L. Reid, 17 Feb 2014 (companion to 'Descendents of James MCKENZIE.rtf' p.3) (has date as 5 May 1855).
  46. [S565] The Launceston Examiner, Launceston, Tasmania, Australia, 1857 'TO THE EDITOR OF THE LAUNCESTON EXAMINER.', Launceston Examiner (Tas. : 1842 - 1899), 29 October, p. 3 Edition: AFTERNOON, viewed 24 October, 2014, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article36302809 ("TO THE EDITOR OF THE LAUNCESTON EXAMINER.
    Sir,-Permit me to reply through your columns to an article in the Cornwall Chronicle of 17th inst., headed " Another charge against a reverend gentleman," seriously impugning my character as a Christian minister. It is therein stated that with reference to the interment of an old man named Shipley, due notice had been given to me of the hour at which it would be requisite for me to be in attendance to read the burial service, but after several hours beyond that time I had not made my appearance,. &c. In regard to this, it is, I suppose, sufficient for me to state that no person whatsover at any time gave me such notice, either by word or in writing. Of precisely the same character for accuracy are the statements of my 'running towards the graveyard," "abusing the contractor in no measured terms," "proceeding in a temper to the grave of poor Shipley," and after the service was over demandilng the Coroner's warrant so as to secure payment of fees.
    When the constable was sent in the afternoon of October 5th to inform me that I was required to bury directly the body of the person named, I was engaged in making ministerial visits at Highfield and the neighborhood, and on being told of his errand, returned at once to the church. As far as I remember, the extent of my communicaltion with the contractor was an expression of regret that the person whose duty it was did not give me timely notice that the funeral was to take place on that day, so that the body might not have been been placed in the grave without the rites of tihe church. Production of the coroner's warrant was requested in obedience to the law. I was not then, nor am I now aware, that fees are payable under such circumstances.
    It is not my custom generally to notice anonymous accusations of this character, but considering that these are calculated seriously to affect my ministerial usefulness, I feel that I ought to state plainly that they are entirely groundless.

    S. B. Fookes.
    Stanley Parsonage, Oct. 23.").
  47. [S570] The Courier (Hobart), Hobart, Tasmania, 1857 'GENERAL INTELLIGENCE.', The Courier (Hobart, Tas. : 1840 - 1859), 21 April, p. 3. , viewed 21 Nov 2020, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2458947
  48. [S570] The Courier (Hobart), Hobart, Tasmania, 1857 'ADDRESS.', The Courier (Hobart, Tas. : 1840 - 1859), 30 November, p. 3, viewed 24 October, 2014, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2461264 (ADDRESS.
    To Rev. S. B. Fookes, Stanley Parsonage.
    Circular Head, 19th November, 1857.
    Dear Sir,-We hear with regret that the connection hitherto existing between us is about to be broken by your departure from Circular Head. We beg to thank you most sincerely for the pains you have taken from time to time in imparting religious instruction to us, and in striving to impress our minds with the truths of our Holy Religion ; and trust, through God's blessing, we may have profited by the same, and that the seed you have sown may bring forth fruit in our after lives. We hope you will accept the accompanying Bible with our best wishes for the happiness of yourself and Mrs. Fookes, and remain
    Yours respectfully,
    [Here follow the signatures of seventy-eight young persons resident in the Parish of Circular Head.]

    REPLY.
    17th November, 1857.
    My Dear Young Friends, - It was with much pleasure that I received your affectionate farewell letter, together with its handsome accompaniment, for both of which I thank you. Some of the happiest hours of my residence at Circular Head have been spent in striving to engraft on your young minds the "glad tidings" of Gospel Truth, and let us join in hoping that this instruction has been blessed by the Most High to your and my benefit here and hereafter. Remembering that it is written, - "Even a child is known by his doings," - I would once more kindly press upon you the duty of being obedient to your teachers, diligent in your studies, and truthful in conversation ; above all, let everything you say and do tend to the glory of God and the extension of the Redeemer's Kingdom. It would fill my heart with joy to hear that as you grow in strength and stature, so in faith and grace. The best return I can give for your remembrance of Mrs. Fookes is an expression of hope (in which she herself joins) that the care bestowed upon and the amusement afforded you by her have not been without their profit.

    Finally, forget not to pray to Him whose encouraging word it is,-" They that seek me early shall find me."
    Believe me,
    Always your faithful friend,
    S. B. Fookes.).
  49. [S728] GEDCOM file created by Donald L. Reid, 17 Feb 2014 (companion to 'Descendents of James MCKENZIE.rtf' p.8).
  50. [S810] The Cornwall Chronicle, Launceston, Tasmania, 1870 'ABSTRACT OF GOVERNMENT NOTICES AND ADVERTISEMENTS.', The Cornwall Chronicle (Launceston, Tas. : 1835 - 1880), 19 January, p. 3. , viewed 07 Dec 2020, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article65986422
  51. [S810] The Cornwall Chronicle, Launceston, Tasmania, 1870 'ABSTRACT OF GOVERNMENT NOTICES AND ADVERTISEMENTS.', The Cornwall Chronicle (Launceston, Tas. : 1835 - 1880), 22 January, p. 4. , viewed 11 Jan 2021, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article65984097
  52. [S810] The Cornwall Chronicle, Launceston, Tasmania, ("In regard to this society, or any institution of the kind, he said it was not difficult to find a text in the holy scriptures suitable for such on occasion, and that it was a wise arrangement that this society did not belong to any denomination of Christians professedly, although he could say from his own knowledge, with only some rare exceptions, that they all belonged to some denomination or other, and they were all bonded together for the express purpose of doing each other good. He could testify from long persona! experience as a minister of the gospel that this society had done a great amount of good ; a proof in point was the fact that the drain on their funds (church funds) was nothing in comparison to what it was before the establishment of this society. He congratulated the members that he was able to bear his testimony to the good that had been already done, and exhorted them to perseverance and unity.").
  53. [S810] The Cornwall Chronicle, Launceston, Tasmania, 1870 'EVANDALE', The Cornwall Chronicle (Launceston, Tas. : 1835 - 1880), 29 January, p. 13. , viewed 07 Dec 2020, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article65983384
  54. [S565] The Launceston Examiner, Launceston, Tasmania, Australia, 1870 'EVANDALE.', Launceston Examiner (Tas. : 1842 - 1899), 23 April, p. 3. , viewed 07 Dec 2020, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article39674670
  55. [S810] The Cornwall Chronicle, Launceston, Tasmania, 1870 'PERTH.', The Cornwall Chronicle (Launceston, Tas. : 1835 - 1880), 23 May, p. 3. , viewed 25 Nov 2020, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article67274743
  56. [S565] The Launceston Examiner, Launceston, Tasmania, Australia, 1870 'PERTH.', Launceston Examiner (Tas. : 1842 - 1899), 14 July, p. 5. , viewed 25 Nov 2020, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article39676105
  57. [S572] The Mercury (Hobart), Hobart, Tasmania, Australia, 1870 'THE GAZETTE.', The Mercury (Hobart, Tas. : 1860 - 1954), 23 August, p. 3. , viewed 29 Nov 2020, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article8865247
  58. [S1184] The Tasmanian, Launceston, Tasmaia, Australia, 1871 'RELIGIOUS.', The Tasmanian (Launceston, Tas. : 1871 - 1879), 28 January, p. 6. , viewed 14 Dec 2020, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article201346334
  59. [S1184] The Tasmanian, Launceston, Tasmaia, Australia, 1871 'THE RECENT CLERICAL CONFERENCE.', The Tasmanian (Launceston, Tas. : 1871 - 1879), 21 January, p. 15. , viewed 22 Nov 2020, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article201343206 (THE RECENT CLERICAL CONFERENCE
    To the Editor of the Tasmanian.
    Sir - by your kind favour and in self-defence, I am obliged to "rush into print". In the paper of Wednesday, 18th instant, containing an account of what transpired at the meeting of clergyman held in St John's School-room after divine service at the Church your reporter represents, and truly, that a subject brought forward by me relative to the Clerical Discipline Act of the dioceses was not allowed to proceed, because, in introducing it reference was made to a certain case now pending in the Ecclesiastical Court, which might be more or less influenced by any remarks that might have been made. Acting under the impression that the invitation to propose any matter that might tend to the interests of the Church of England in this colony was advanced in good faith, I had prepared my statement and grievance in such a manner that by no possibility could they have interfered in the smallest degree with the administration of justice. Had reasonable time and opportunity been granted to me I could have shown that by my remarks referred solely to the position of the clergy as things are when lying under the stigma of scandalous and unworthy conduct. Presuming on the probability which the event realised, of the rural dean of Longford being in his place, and knowing that he was chairman of a certain commission composed of clergyman and laymen assembled to enquire into a charge against the Incumbent of Avoca, my intention was to ask him the following questions:
    1. Under what authority the members of that commission acted? If the reason for this be not obvious, let me make it so. In the Ecclesiastical Discipline Act there is not only the absence of the right of any living being to appoint such a court, but absolutely no reference to it at all.
    2. If it be true, as reported, that the clerical defendant and his churchwarden were, on application, refused admission to the place where and at the time these commissions were sitting and examining witnesses in the case?
    3. Whether evidence of an indecent nature was or was not given, and taken on this occasion in St. Thomas's Church at Avoca?
    4. If the use of the church for such a purpose was granted by the incumbent and churchwardens, or any of them?
    Now will anyone dispute my right to urge a matter of this kind before my rev. brethren in Conference, when it requires no argument to show that in the answers given thereto I and everyone of our number are most materially interested? If there be such an one, let him come and show it.
    As your reporter truly says, the Archdeacon of Launceston gave us a reason for silencing me that the motion was unexpected, but he forgot when saying so (as church dignitaries will sometimes forget) that it was not a whit more so than everything brought forward by himself. Of course I cannot tell what my more favoured brethren may have received in the way of information, but judging from the sequel it would seem as if they were in the same extreme ignorance as myself of any subject that was about to be submitted. True, there was one matter discussed after a fashion, and one only. Why? Because the rest were sown up, in a manner, broadcast before us that it was beyond the range of human memory one by one to recall them. If to this be added the too-evident impatience to adjourn at a quarter to 1 for luncheon at 2, and my discomfiture was complete. But let me ask, is or rather ought not an assembly of divines, met together for the interests of the Church to which they minister, to be of too grave and solemn a nature to be swayed and influenced by considerations like these? One of the most serious banes to free thought and expression in the present age is the arbitrary manner in which presidents of meetings, ecclesiastical or civil, exercise authority. Their duty, as I take it, is simply to set before the audience in few words, what are the objects of the meeting, and to preserve comely order and decorum during its continuance; in place of that, almost invariably, as far as my experience goes, we have, without the possibility of prevention or even dissent, a constant repetition of what Shakespeare so graphically describes -
    "I am Sir Oracle,
    and when I ope my lips, let no dog bark!"
    And as to the victims, they are forced, whether or no, silently to ask their own hearts, in the expressive language of the same great delineate of human nature -
    "Why should a man, whose blood is warm within,
    Sit like his grandsire cut in alabaster?"
    But move they dare not - except towards the door. - I am, Sir, you're thankful servant,
    S.B. Fookes).
  60. [S810] The Cornwall Chronicle, Launceston, Tasmania, 1871 'THE RECENT CLERICAL CONFERENCE.', The Cornwall Chronicle (Launceston, Tas. : 1835 - 1880), 20 January, p. 2. , viewed 25 Nov 2020, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article67114221
  61. [S1184] The Tasmanian, Launceston, Tasmaia, Australia, 1871 'THE LATE CLERICAL MEETING.', The Tasmanian (Launceston, Tas. : 1871 - 1879), 21 January, p. 9. , viewed 08 Jan 2021, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article201343201
  62. [S810] The Cornwall Chronicle, Launceston, Tasmania, 1871 'The Cornwall Chronicle WITH WHICH IS INCORPORATED THE LAUNCESTON TIMES. FRIDAY, JANUARY 20, 1871.', The Cornwall Chronicle (Launceston, Tas. : 1835 - 1880), 20 January, p. 2. , viewed 07 Jan 2021, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article67114208
  63. [S1184] The Tasmanian, Launceston, Tasmaia, Australia, 1871 'MISCELLANEOUS.', The Tasmanian (Launceston, Tas. : 1871 - 1879), 4 February, p. 11. , viewed 13 Jan 2021, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article201345505
  64. [S810] The Cornwall Chronicle, Launceston, Tasmania, 1871 'LAUNCESTON AND WESTERN RAILWAY.', The Cornwall Chronicle (Launceston, Tas. : 1835 - 1880), 1 February, p. 2. , viewed 13 Jan 2021, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article67111288
  65. [S810] The Cornwall Chronicle, Launceston, Tasmania, 1871 'THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.', The Cornwall Chronicle (Launceston, Tas. : 1835 - 1880), 7 June, p. 3. , viewed 15 Jan 2021, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article67111547
  66. [S810] The Cornwall Chronicle, Launceston, Tasmania, 1871 'CYNICS GROWLS.', The Cornwall Chronicle (Launceston, Tas. : 1835 - 1880), 16 June, p. 3. , viewed 24 Nov 2020, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article67111855 (CYNICS GROWLS
    To the editor of the Cornwall Chronical Sm,— Your facetious contributor, the ' Cynic,' malies such frequent reference in your paper to the affairs of the Church of England in this colony, and is evidently so well ' up' in details connected there with, that I am disposed to think he must have taken lessons in grumbling at the very table of a certain school of circumlocution established in The North, whose perennial mission appears to be how-not-to-do-it. True to the nature of a genius who has the words rave canem always on his lips, be has, I observe, selected me by name as a fit and proper subject for tho last 'growl.' This is very ungracious and superfluous as well, because as every body knows, there is no need of being warned against the attacks of the noble dog, and as to the ignoble cur, why experience showeth that 'his bark is worse than his bite,' as the old proverb saith. Certainly your philosopher, [?] propensity for railing, can claim kindred with many who have gone before, specially with one whose boast was this— 'Satire is my weapon' but then, with rare exceptions, they were sagacious enough to forecast and wise enough to avoid the temerity and danger of playing with edged tools. When I read the 'Cynic's' attempts at sarcasm over things us they are with us, particularly in such stock pieces as the late, ball at Government House, they forcibly remind me of the ' wise saw' put forth by the jester in King Lear— "I had rather be any kind of thing than a fool ; and yet I would not be thee, nuncle; though hast pared thy wit o' both sides, and left nothing in the middle.'
    Your obedient servent .
    S.B. Fookes
    June 13, 1871).
  67. [S1184] The Tasmanian, Launceston, Tasmaia, Australia, 1871 'CYNIC'S GROWLS.', The Tasmanian (Launceston, Tas. : 1871 - 1879), 17 June, p. 4. , viewed 24 Nov 2020, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article201344202
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    Wikipedia citation.
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    DISTRESSING ACCIDENT.
    (From our own Correspondent.)
    A very distressing and fatal accident happened on Friday evening last, to a little boy about 5 years old, son of the Rev. S. B; Fookes, who was accidentally killed by the kick of a horse. The child was first missed about six o'clock in the evening and in the course of the night a number of the residents of the township assisted by the police, were searching in every direction, but nothing could be seen or heard of him until four o'clock the next morning, when the poor little fellow was found by his own mother quite dead, in a paddock adjoining tlieir house.
    An inquest was held on Saturday before C. Arthur Esq., and a respectable jury of which Mr W. Brand was foreman, when the following evidence was taken.
    Samuel B. Fookes deposed—I reside at Perth and am minister of the parish. The deceased Arthur Fookes is my son; I saw him alive last at four o'clock yesterday afternoon, he was in my own house and was quite well; he was five years of age ; I left home soon after four o'clock and went down to Leighlands ; my son-in-law Mr Reid, came down about nine o'clock to tell, me that Arthur was lost; I immediately came home and searched for him everywhere until half-past two next morning, but he could not be found ; I then lay down for an hour and a half and rose about four and continued the search especially along the river, I thought he was drowned. On arriving at the hill near the stone quarry I heard a cooey as if from my own house, and returned home outside the gate I met Mrs Fookes and Mr Whitchurch. My wife told me she had found the child dead in the paddock; I went into the house to see him but found him quite dead ; I then went to the place where he was found, and saw a mark as if a small body had been lying there. At one end there was a quantity of blood, but there were no marks whatever of a struggle having taken place ; I had been through the same paddock once or twice before but saw nothing unusual on those occasions. When I first saw the body I observed several marks about the face as if he had been kicked by a horse. My own horse had been running in the paddock on Friday evening, and had him turned out about midnight.
    Louisa Jane Fookes, deposed—I am the wife of the Rev. S. B. Fookes, of Perth. The deceased was my fourth son, I saw him alive last about five o'clock, yesterday evening. He was then in the lane between the garden and the back of our house. He was walking with his brother. At six o'clock I missed him, but supposed him to be away with his elder brother. His brother returned soon afterwards without him ; I immediately ran to the back of the house and shouted his name ; I also ran up the lane, where I last saw him, but did not see, anything of him. I then thought of the river, and went with my daughter to search in that direction. We also searched in the garden, but did not look in the back paddock, because others were looking there. I continued to search until nine o'clock, and then sent for Mr Fookes. After he came home we all searched until midnight. It was a bright moonlight night; I then went into the house and lay down. I went out again about 4 a.m. and looked carefully about the stable and outbuildings; I then went into the paddock, and when I had gone a few steps I saw my child's hat at a short . distance, and on looking about saw him lying a few yards from it. He was lying stretched upon his breast and his left cheek. I thought lie might be asleep, but on going up to embrace, him, I found he was quite dead. The face was very much bruised and covered with blood ; I took him into the house and laid him on the bed.
    Dr John Mason deposed,—I am a legally qualified medical practitioner; I have this day made an external examination of the body of the deceased child, Arthur Fookes ; I found a sharply defined wound in the lower lip, extending through to the lower jaw bone, the edge of which was fractured ; the upper jaw and roof of the mouth being also fractured. On the right side of the head there were contused marks, such as might be produced by a severe fall, on the ground caused by the kick of a horse. The conclusions I draw are that deceased was kicked by a horse and was probably struck by the edge of the shoe, and thrown violently backwards to the ground, thereby causing the contusions, and death from injuries to the brain resulting from concussion. In my opinion the child never regained consciousness after the fall, but; evidently rolled over on to the face at the last moment.
    The Coroner having summed up, a verdict of accidental death by the kick of a horse, was returned.).
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    March 31st, 1874.
    Henry Read, Esq., Seton, near Richmond.
    Sir,-In compliance with a mandate from the Bishop, I have this evening sent an advertisement to be inserted in The Mercury of Thursday next, convening a meeting of the parishioners of Richmond to decide in whom the patronage of the cure shall be vested. Notice to that effect has also been posted on the church doors for the last two Sundays. Being not desirous of coming in contact in any way with you or your fellow-churchwarden - Captain Ogilvy - I request you will be good enough to arrange with the sexton about the meeting, and also see that the return of the minutes of proceedings be sent to the Bishop, when it is over. I did not reply to your last letter to me, because I thought it well to wait a little, until an opportunity offered of doing so, but I cannot help saying now, how inconsistent it seems to me to be, that you should plead want of influence among the people as a reason for declining to decorate the church on the occasion of the Bishop's visit for a harvest home, when, a short time before that, influence had been successfully used to gather an assembly of persons to irritate and provoke me ; one of whom as you must know is (the writer here uses language which we decline to publish), and others among them are never seen within the walk of the church. Your fellow-churchwarden, with whom you act, never answered the request at all, on the very faith of the fact that he had made a complaint of decorations before. Then for both of you to leave the work to me is simply unbearable. It is not necessary for me to write what I think of it at all, for you must both know that well enough.
    It is incumbent upon me now to apprise you officially, that it is my intention to give up the cure as soon as circumstances will permit. After what I consider the shameful indignity to which I have been exposed through your advertisement, inserted without even the common courtesy of making me acquainted with the intention, there is nothing else, in my estimation, to be done. Unfortunately my landlord absolutely refuses to release me from the engagement of the house I now occupy, or I should be glad to relieve the parishioners of myself and my family before the closing of another day.
    I remain, Sir,
    Your obedient servant,
    SAML. B. FOOKES.

    Richmond,
    April 7th, 1874.
    Henry Read, Esq., Richmond.
    Sir,-You are quite welcome to show my last letter to you to Captain Ogilvy, or any one else you like. My desire is that every one should know what I think of you, and your " respected fellow-churchwarden too."'
    SAML. B. FOOKES).
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  149. [S1220] The Tribune (Hobart), Hobart, Tasmaia, Australia, 1878 'IMPOUNDING AT RICHMOND.', Tribune (Hobart, Tas. : 1876 - 1879), 30 April, p. 3. , viewed 24 Nov 2020, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article201735046 (IMPOUNDING AT RICHMOND.
    TO THE EDITOR OF THE TRIBUNE
    Sir, -Experience shows that you are always ready to ventilate in your columns any subject that may be of interest or concern to the public at large, and therefore I respectfully beg insertion for the following grievance :—
    On Tuesday, 23rd inst., at 11 a.m., I attended at the Council Chamber, Richmond, in obedience to a summons for suffering a cow to graze in a public street. The council clerk then informed me that I must wait until noon, as the Sub. -Inspector, a witness in the case, was absent on duty. As this functionary was not called at the hearing I objected to the delay and loss of time to myself, to which the Warden replied : (having had, as it would appear, no communication with his sub-ordinate in the meantime), that it was entirely owing to the absence of a second magistrate to sit on the Bench. In a Court of Justice you are not allowed to state what you think, so I will say now that I do not know which to believe to this day. When the matter was gone into, the constable swore that he took the cow to the pound at 1130 on 16th inst., and having no watch of his own, he got the time from the pound-keeper. Mr, Henry Graham, being called, deposed that it was the constable who told him the hour, as it flashed across his mind at the time, that there would be a payment of double fees. Notwithstanding this, the Warden told me, with a homily, about the indiscriminate application of the law, that the policeman's evidence had not been shaken, and I was fined. 1 could not object to being lectured in this way whilst on the floor of a court, but I do object now through the Press. Possibly, it might pass muster, if the law were not dead against conviction under such evidence as that given. It distinctly lays down the offence to be "wilfully and knowingly" suffering cattle to graze, so that unless proof be given that there was the will to offend, 'and knowledge of the offence being committed, in the eye of the law there is no transgression at all. Not the least attempt was made to show this. But were the law ever so clear and decisive in favour of the magistrate's decision, surely there is such a thing as justice. Every body must allow that it is a very pardonable matter for a beast accidentally to stray into a street, still in a state of nature, and covered with grass, although the township has, been in existence for fifty years ; and that one punishment might be regarded as sufficient. That is not the order of things at Richmond. The unfortunate victims must have a threefold sentence : — First, poundage foes ; secondly, loss of. time in waiting for the magistrate or the sub-inspector, as the
    case may have been ; thirdly, fines. In principle, it carries one's thoughts back to barbarous days, when something like this was the prescribed course : in early morning, thumb-screws ; then, " bide a wee" for the executioner's leisure; finally, the pillory. In one sense they are exactly parallel, in that there is no appeal. " We'll state a case for you," said their Worships. "Just so; but that means more blackmail, and is very likely to turn out a case — with me."
    It is too serious a matter for joking ; for the community generally have now taken the measure of our local court, and act accordingly. I myself was witness to a defendant being charged with " wilfully and knowingly". suffering cattle to be in a street, to which he pleaded guilty, and then deliberately urged, in mitigation of penalty, that he know nothing at all about it. He succeeded. It is easy to see what the rising generation will be under a system like this.
    People talk to me about the fact that no cattle belonging to a magistrate or coroner, or any one approaching to such a dignity, find their way to the pound, or the owners putting in an appearance at the Council Chamber; and the general conclusion is, that we are a down-trodden lot, who pay for the very means whereby we are enslaved. If, then, any of your readers are looking out for a home, and are thinking of Richmond, permit me to say, "Don t, for you may as well be in Siberia."
    One thing more. I am of opinion that, the tu quoque argument is generally in defensible; but it must be used some times. At my trial alluded to before, the Superintendent of Police laid great stress on the old fence round the paddook in which my cattle run, to which I could not reply. Truly, it has been erected many years, of sawn material such as is now never used, and, therefore, it is difficult to keep it as it ought to be. A few days ago I felt curious. to know whether there was one law for the policeman and another for the clergyman, as the inhabitants. understand it here; So in the presence of a respectable witness, I examined the fence, made of the same material as my own, bounding the allotment in which the animals of the saidS uperintendent are accustomed to run, and facing a public street. Well, I do not like to pick too great a hole in any man's coat, so let it suffice to say that it fully justified the application of the old saying, "They who live in glass houses should not throw stones." Any one can see for himself, if he will.
    ln conclusion, the problem we want solved, Mr. Editor, is simply this-Custo-dea nostros quis custodiet?- Who will keep our keepers? If you anyone else can say how this is, to be done, a great favour will be conferred on many, more besides
    Your obedient servant, ,
    S.B. FOOKES
    New Norfolk, April 29, 1878.).
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